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Oldest Fossils Aren’t

first_imgA new analysis of the world’s oldest claimed fossil rock, a banded deposit off the coast of Greenland said to be 3.8 billion years old, probably contains no signature of life, reports Stephen Moorbath (Oxford) in Nature.1  He has visited the Akilia site twice where rocks were purported to contain graphite of biological origin.  He couldn’t find it. This persuasive discovery seems an almost inevitable, yet highly problematic, consequence to the increasing scientific doubts about the original claim.  We may well ask what exactly was the material originally analysed and reported?  What was the apatite grain with supposed graphite inclusions that figured on the covers of learned and popular journals soon after the discovery?  These questions must surely be answered and, if necessary, lessons learned for the more effective checking and duplication of spectacular scientific claims from the outset.    To my regret, the ancient Greenland rocks have not yet produced any compelling evidence for the existence of life by 3.8 billion years ago. (Emphasis added in all quotes.)Add to that the downgrading of claims about life-signatures in Western Australian rocks said to be 3.5 billion years old, and there is a big gap until the more reliable claims of bacterial fossils in Ontario’s Gunflint formation said to be 1.9 billion years old.  “ To have a chance of success,” he warns, “it seems that the search for remnants of earliest life must be carried out on sedimentary rocks that are as old, unmetamorphosed, unmetasomatized and undeformed as possible.  That remains easier said than done.”1Stephen Moorbath, “Palaeobiology: Dating earliest life,” Nature 434, 155 (10 March 2005); doi:10.1038/434155a.This admission does nothing to help the Darwinists.  Even trusting the shaky dating methods for the sake of argument, it adds to the problem that life appeared suddenly in a profusion of forms.  Moorbath has just robbed his fellow Darwinists of half their allotted practice time for bacteria to hone their engineering skills.  Those bacteria must have had to race extra fast to invent all the molecular machines needed for the higher organisms that followed.  To add to the Darwinists’ woes, the microbiologists are finding evidence of sophistication in the most “primitive” forms of life (see next entry).  A cartoon of a man’s head in a vice comes to mind.    Did you catch the line that a claim was made without sufficient evidence, yet was featured on the covers of “learned and popular journals”?  Could that be happening today?  Has anyone learned the lesson? (Visited 8 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more


Harvest forms for NCGA Yield Contest now available

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest With harvest underway in some areas and soon to begin in others, the National Corn Growers Association announces that online harvest forms for the 2015 National Corn Yield Contest are now available. While the harvest information form deadline may seem distant, entrants are asked to report within seven business days of their final yield check or by Nov. 20, whichever comes first.“While harvest has only begun in a few areas, we ask contest applicants to submit harvest forms within one week of their final yield check to allow NCGA staff adequate time to thoroughly review each form,” said Production and Stewardship Action Team Chair Don Glenn, a farmer from Alabama. “The National Corn Yield Contest plays a significant role in recognizing excellence and finding new, more productive techniques. We hope that growers continue to support the contest by seeing their entry through and submitting their completed harvest data forms.”The National Corn Yield Contest is now in its 51st year and remains NCGA’s most popular program for members. While an official count of the entries submitted for the 2015 contest is not yet available, participation appears to be strong again this year.The online harvest form is available to both farmers and seed representatives using the same login process as the initial entry form. Login does require submission of the entrant’s NCGA membership number.NCGA moved to a solely online entry platform this year. As part of this process, entrants must upload an image or PDF of weigh tickets in the electronic harvest form.  Supervisors need to either initial or sign the weigh ticket, and that will serve as their signature. If an entrant does not have the capability to scan, they will be permitted to mail in the weigh tickets with a copy of the confirmation.Rule changes have been announced for 2015, and detailed information is available on the website. Each NCGA membership used to register for the contest must have an individual’s name on it, and each individual may have only one membership number. Each membership number may have as many contest entries as desired but, as in previous years, each number will only be awarded official placement for one state and one national level entry.Contest winners will be announced on December 18. Winners receive national recognition in publications such as the NCYC Corn Yield Guide, as well as cash trips or other awards from participating sponsoring seed, chemical and crop protection companies. The winners will be honored during Commodity Classic 2016 in New Orleans, La.For access to contest information and a detailed list of the entry and harvest rules, click here.Click here for the 2015 National Corn Yield Contest Online Harvest Form.last_img read more


Knowing and Doing

first_imgDan Pink is one of my favorite writers. To Sell Is Human should be required reading, especially for non-salespeople who have to sell. His book Drive should be required reading for leaders and managers.I love Malcolm Gladwell, too. Like Pink, he is a tremendous writer and storyteller. The Tipping Point should be required reading for entrepreneurs and marketers. Blink should be required reading for salespeople. And Outliers should be read by all success-minded people.Both Pink and Gladwell are intellectuals. They both intellectualize the topics about which they write. You can learn a lot by reading them. But you can’t learn what you need to learn to be successful by reading intellectualized accounts of any subject.I have never played tennis, nor have I ever been on skis. I have never hit a tennis ball over a net, and I have never once made my way down the side of a mountain or a hill on two slick pieces of plastic. I could right now read a dozen books on tennis or skiing and still be completely unable to play tennis or ski better than I could by taking a couple of lessons. But having taken some lessons and spending some time on a tennis court or a hill, reading could help me understand my experience and how to improve it.You produce the best results in areas you are working to improve by coupling your experiential learning with your intellectual learning.If you read any good book on investing, that book will surely tell you that you must not be emotional about the investments you make. When you start losing in a position, you sell that position and protect yourself from losses. But you won’t know what it feels like to sell a stock that is down 10% when it is being hyped on television and when other people are building their position.You can read a good book on selling, and you will almost invariably find something about closing, or asking for commitments. You can read the words, you can understand the script, but until you ask a prospective client sitting across from you to sign an agreement, you won’t have any idea what that experience feels like (especially when they refuse to sign).You can read books about success and personal development, all of which have valuable messages and even more valuable guides to the actions you must take in order to succeed. But reading about personal development and success won’t make you successful. Only taking action will. (But if you take in enough success-oriented content, I promise you will start to take action.)There is a difference between an intellectual understanding of a subject and actually knowing the subject matter. Knowing something alone doesn’t produce any measurable results. Knowing something, having some chops, only works if you couple it with action (and if it’s something important to you, massive action). You will learn much of what you need to be successful by doing.You know enough already. But are you taking enough action?last_img read more