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Palaeontological studies for CRP-3: introduction

first_imgThe drillhole at CRP-3 was the deepest of the project and offered early hopes of retrieving a long plalaeontological record. However, the reality was that the fossilcontent dropped off markedly in the lower half of the hole, leaving some tantalising unknowns and uncertainties concerning palaeoenvironments and biochronology. Thus,authors agree that the age of the bottom of CRP-2/2A is early Oligocene, as is the top of CRP-3, but the amount of possible overlap is debatable and even slight underlap islikely. Likewise, despite some palaeontological hints that the lower part of the Cenozoic sequence could be within the topmost Eocene, just how much is uncertain.Twelve papers address aspects of the fossil remains found within the CRP-3 drillcoreso far.last_img


NUS Vice-President cleared of Malia coup attempt claims

first_imgAn inquiry has found that NUS Vice-President Richard Brooks did not conspire to remove Malia Bouattia as President of the NUS, and cleared him of any wrongdoing.In January, it was alleged that hidden camera footage from Al Jazeera depicted the senior NUS officer plotting against its President.Brooks denied any wrongdoing, and referred himself to an internal investigation in the Union.Following the results of the investigation, Brooks posted on Facebook, attacking the “far left candidates electioneering and anti-Semites who troll anyone mentioned with the word Israel next to their name”.Brooks told Cherwell: “I’m relieved that the investigation, which I referred myself for, has found no evidence of any wrongdoing on my part.“I hope this is now a moment where we all can come together ensuring we continue to do great work transforming students’ lives and make students’ unions even better.”Since her election as NUS President in 2016, Malia Bouattia has been criticised for alleged anti-Semitism and has been criticised for “outright racism” in a report by the Home Affairs Select Committee. The initial allegations against Brooks had surfaced in an Al-Jazeera report titled “The Lobby”, which claimed it had found evidence of Israeli influence in student politics and the Labour Party.Brooks wrote online: “I do not work on behalf of the Israeli Government. I have never met anyone from the Israeli Government.“I have not accepted funds from the Israeli Government. It is a lie to say or infer otherwise.”He added: “The last month has been a difficult one for me. My phone has lit up constantly from social media abuse, my family and friends checking on how I am and lies and mistruths posted about me all over the world.“By most people’s standards, it was a sharp start to elections season.”Malia Bouattia and the NUS have been contacted for comment.last_img read more


When fairness prevails

first_imgPhilosophers and scientists have long puzzled over the origins of fairness. Work by a group of Harvard researchers offers some clues, with the discovery that uncertainty is critical in the concept’s development.Using computer simulations of evolution, researchers at Harvard’s Program for Evolutionary Dynamics (PED) — including Director Martin Nowak, scientist David Rand, and junior fellow Corina Tarnita — found that uncertainty is key to fairness. Hisashi Ohtsuki from the Graduate University for Advanced Studies in Kanagawa, Japan, also contributed to the study. Their work was described in a Jan. 21 paper in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.“A number of papers have studied the evolution of fairness over the years,” said Rand, who will begin an assistant professorship at Yale this summer. “Our novel contribution was to take the effects of randomness into account. What we found was that as we turned up the uncertainty in our simulations, it fundamentally changed the nature of the evolutionary dynamic. The result was that in a world that has a lot of uncertainty, it actually became optimal to be fair, and natural selection favored fairness.”To model fairness, Rand and colleagues used the Ultimatum Game, which involves two players bargaining over a pot of money. The first player proposes how the money should be split. If the second player accepts the offer, the money is split as proposed; if the offer is rejected, the game is over and neither player gets anything.“The reason this game is interesting is that if you assume everyone is rational and self-interested, the second player should accept any offer, because even if they’re getting only one dollar it’s still better than nothing,” Rand said. “The first player should anticipate that, and should make the minimum possible offer.”The game almost never works that way, however.Instead, Rand said, many people will reject offers they believe are unfair. Earlier studies have shown that as many as half of players will reject offers of 30 percent or less — meaning they are effectively paying to retaliate against the other player for making such a low offer, or to stop the other player from getting ahead.“The proximate psychological explanation for why people behave this way in the Ultimatum Game is that they have a preference for fairness, and they’re willing to pay to create equality,” Rand said. “The question we were trying to answer was: Why? Why did we come to have those preferences?”Rand and his colleagues built a series of computer players, each of which had a specific strategy describing how much they would offer, and how much they would accept. Each round, all the computer players played the game with one another. Then they updated their strategies in a process similar to genetic evolution.“You can think of it as though the players that earned higher payoffs attracted more imitators. Players sometimes choose to change their behavior, and when they do, they copy the strategies of players who were more successful,” Rand explained. “It could also represent actual genetic evolution, where players with [a] big payoff leave more offspring. Either way, higher payoff strategies tend to become more common in the population over time.”By observing which strategies become dominant over multiple generations, the researchers were able to track how the system evolved, and saw that fairness offered players an evolutionary advantage, but only when uncertainty was factored into the system.To test whether these results would play out in the real world, Rand and colleagues used the online labor market Amazon Mechanical Turk to recruit hundreds of volunteers from around the globe. After playing the Ultimatum Game, participants were asked how easy it was for people in their community to determine who is, and who isn’t, successful.“We found exactly what the model predicted, which, I think, wouldn’t have been at all obvious had we not done the modeling first,” Rand said. “What we found is a correlation — the more uncertainty there is about who is successful and who isn’t, the more fair people are in the Ultimatum Game.”Understanding why that is, however, is trickier.“Think about a world where nobody is offering anything — everyone is completely rational and self-interested,” Rand said. “If you introduce a fair person into a world like that, they will do poorly, because they will make generous offers, and people will accept them. Other people, however, will make low offers to that person, and they will be rejected. As a result the fair person will never have the chance to succeed.”The same is true of a rational person in a generally fair world. Their low offers will be rejected, resulting in a poor payoff.So what happens if you assume that successful strategies are always successful and unsuccessful strategies are always unsuccessful, as previous studies have?“If you’re in a selfish world, the population can never leave that state, because the fair person is always at a disadvantage,” he said. “If you rely on these kind of deterministic dynamics, that first fair person is always going to die out and fairness as a strategy will never spread.“Whereas in a world where there’s uncertainty, when someone experiments with a fair strategy in a world of selfish people, they will still get a bad payoff, but sometimes just by chance that fair strategy might become more common in the population,” he continued. “And once it becomes common enough, the momentum switches and it’s better to be fair than selfish. That’s how it becomes the favored behavior.”This work was funded by support from the John Templeton Foundation.last_img read more


Giving weight too much weight

first_imgPrograms to fight obesity can exacerbate eating disorders if they put too much emphasis on weight rather than exercise and healthy eating, said experts in a panel discussion at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.The conundrum highlights the complexity of addressing eating disorders such as bulimia, anorexia, and binge eating at time when recognition is low, screening inadequate, insurance coverage sketchy, and fighting obesity has become a public health priority, the panelists said.“Some obesity programs are backfiring because of their focus on weight and on the scale,” said Claire Mysko, chief executive officer of the National Eating Disorders Association. “These [eating disorders] are serious public health issues, woefully misunderstood, underfunded, and often untreated.”Some 30 million Americans have diagnosed eating disorders and many more are undiagnosed, said Alison Field, chair of epidemiology at Brown University and head of the Growing Up Today study, which follows 17,000 boys and girls age 9 to 14.The weight-obsessed teenage girl of stereotype is just the tip of the iceberg, Field said. Eating disorders are also an issue with boys, though the details can differ — an obsession with low body fat, the perfect physique, and washboard abs. Eating disorders affect people of all ages, walks of life, and ethnic and racial groups.Joining Field and Mysko for “Eating Disorders, Mental Health, and Body Image,” were S. Bryn Austin, a professor of social and behavioral sciences at the Harvard Chan School and director of the Strategic Training Initiative for Prevention of Eating Disorders, and Thomas Weigel, an instructor in psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and associate medical director for McLean Hospital’s Klarman Eating Disorders Center. The event was moderated by Carol Hills, senior producer and reporter for PRI’s “The World.”Eating disorders fall into three main categories. In anorexia, the patient eats very little; bulimia involves binge eating followed by a compensating behavior such as vomiting; and a binge eating disorder — the most common of the three — includes binge eating without the compensating behavior.There are many people who may not precisely fit those criteria but for whom thoughts about food and body weight are disruptive, Mysko said. Education on the subject is poor enough that people often call the National Eating Disorders Association helpline and say, “I don’t know if I qualify,” she said.A disposition for an eating disorder can be inherited, the panelists said. Those suffering from eating disorders are often experiencing social stresses such as family conflicts or have in their history childhood trauma or sexual abuse. Many are also dealing with issues related to depression or addiction.A media culture that bombards us with pictures and videos of ultra-thin women and “ripped” men is another key contributor, Mysko said.The disorders take a heavy toll. People can lose hair and suffer constipation. Becoming malnourished can affect heart health, weakening the heart muscle and creating electrolyte imbalances, Weigel said. Malnourishment can stunt bone growth and cause osteoporosis and fractures in young patients.Recovery includes individual and sometimes family therapy, as well as fostering healthy eating habits.While panelists agreed that recognition of eating disorders is still too low, they also said there has been an international push to address the issue in the modeling industry, by standardizing certain health criteria for models. In the United States, advocates have begun to lobby the Occupational Safety and Health Administration to develop guidelines for the modeling industry. Some retailers, including American Eagle, have lately made an effort to feature models with a more realistic physique.Panelists offered a suite of recommendations to address the problem, including early screening for eating disorders, encouraging pediatricians to ask patients about binging and purging, restoring monitoring of eating disorders by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, getting states to ban the sale of diet pills and muscle-building supplements to minors, and closing loopholes that let insurance companies deny coverage.last_img read more


Website fosters faith

first_imgThe Notre Dame Alumni Association launched a new website, FaithND, to extend the University’s spiritual resources beyond campus in an effort to fill a void for religious guidance online. Spirituality program director Angie Appleby Purcell said the site is available to people of all faith traditions interested in exploring Catholicism, even if they are not affiliated with the University. “As a Catholic university steeped in rich tradition, with wonderful resources of faculty, staff, students and alumni trying to live the University’s mission in terms of how to be a people of faith, a Catholic community into the world, we want to be able to provide good quality resources and enrichment for the spiritual and faith journey that we all are on,” Purcell said. FaithND offers a variety of informative services, such as video reflections on liturgical seasons and scripture passages, online courses and opportunities to ask questions about the Catholic faith, Purcell said. One of the best ways to stay engaged with one’s faith is to sign up for the daily email newsletter that includes the day’s Gospel reading, a written reflection on it, a short prayer and a profile of a saint, she said. “[Every morning] I grab my iPhone on the side of my bed, and I read the reflection and the prayer and the saint of the day, and many people start their day with that first step,” Purcell said. More than 9,000 people have signed up for the daily email subscription thus far, Purcell said. Another important feature of the website is the ability to submit prayer requests at the Grotto, a service that existed even before FaithND but is now streamlined. The Alumni Association received more than 24,000 of these requests last year, Purcell said, and they still manage to light a candle for every one. “The Grotto is a significant part of the spiritual imagination of people who are formed here,” she said “They can’t be there in that sacred space, but they certainly can allow us who are here on campus to pray on their behalf.” While most of these services fall under the sphere of prayer, the FaithND website includes three other sections: “Live,” “Serve” and “Explore.” The “Live” section provides monthly themes for reflection on how to live a life of faith, Purcell said. “This month, because we’re very mindful of November being All Saints [Day] and remembering holy people in our lives, we’re focusing on the call to holiness, not from the standpoint of ‘I have to be a Mother Teresa,’ but, ‘In my daily life, how am I called and how can I make decisions based on how to be a better, more holy person?’” she said. The “Serve” section focuses on ways to give back to the community of faith, Purcell said. “[It] talks about how through our faith we are called to service through Catholic Social Tradition, what does that look like, how are we at Notre Dame forming leaders for the Church?” she said. The “Explore” section addresses the intellectual aspects of faith, Purcell said, and it strives to answer the questions, “How do we explore the Catholic intellectual side of what we offer on campus, and how can that inform us as we move forward in life?” Purcell said FaithND was developed after months of research on the spiritual desires of the Notre Dame community, especially those of young alumni. “This came about ultimately from our constituency, our larger Notre Dame family, internally and externally, as to where Notre Dame could help them in continuing to grow in faith,” she said. “It was really a mandate from our constituency and our Notre Dame family.” Those interested in exploring the resources available though FaithND can visit faith.nd.edu Contact Tori Roeck at [email protected]last_img read more


DIY landscape program

first_imgYou want your yard to not only look its best but be its best at meeting your family’s needs. You just don’t know enough about landscape design to create a place that does that. Cheer up. The University of Georgia has created a one-day program just for you.The UGA horticulture faculty will present “Landscape Design Basics for the Do-It-Yourself Gardener” Oct. 15 on the Athens, Ga., campus.The program will start at 8 a.m. and end at 4:15 p.m. at the Miller Plant Science Building Auditorium. It will cover the basics of designing your home landscape.Learn how to develop a site plan and lay out different use areas. Find out how to choose the right plant for the right place and get a top-10 list of plants for problem places like shady, wet and dry areas. Grasp the basics of using seasonal color. And see how to use proper planting techniques to ensure a successful landscape.Get all that and lunch, too, for $20. You have to preregister, though. A brochure with a registration form is on-line at http://pubs.caes.uga.edu/caespubs/landscape-design.htm.To learn more about the program, call Bob Westerfield at (770) 228-7243. Or just mail your name, address and phone number with a $20 check made out to the Georgia 4-H Foundation to Angela Anderson, 205 Hoke Smith Building, Athens, GA 30602-4356. University of Georgialast_img read more


Vermont Chamber of Commerce names 2011-2012 Top Ten Winter Events

first_imgThe Vermont Chamber of Commerce announces the highly anticipated 2011-2012 Top Ten Winter Events.  Each year, a panel of independent judges chooses Vermont’s best activities, selected for their diversity, wide appeal, and consistency with Vermont’s brand. Vicky Tebbetts, Vermont Chamber Senior VP, noted, ‘Vermont is known for being a destination in which to relax, reconnect with friends and family, get outdoors, and get back to basics. This year’s Vermont Chamber Top Ten Winter Events feature time-honored traditions as well as contemporary experiences from all regions of the state.’ The Vermont Chamber Top Ten Winter Events take place from November 2011 through March 2012. The winners in chronological order are: Thanksgiving Weekend at Billings Farm & MuseumWoodstock, November 25 ‘ 27, 2011, 10 am ‘ 3:30 pmWalk back in time during Thanksgiving at Frederick Billings’ 1890 farmhouse. Visitors are greeted by costumed interpreters as they demonstrate cooking a traditional Thanksgiving meal in the historic kitchen. Relax in the Victorian parlor and learn how the American Thanksgiving evolved; ride in horse drawn wagons around the farm fields. Adults $12, seniors $11, students (5-15) $6, ages 3-4 $3, 2 and under free. www.billingsfarm.org(link is external), 802-457-2355. Vermont International FestivalEssex Junction, December 2-4, 2011, Fri. 5 – 8 pm, Sat. 10 am ‘ 6 pm, Sun. 10 am ‘ 5 pmThe Vermont International Festival is a unique, unforgettable celebration of the cultures that comprise our community. Find crafts from all over the world, ethnic and gourmet foods, and traditional international music, dance and stories. Local cultural and ethnic organizations provide information about their programs with exhibits, demonstrations and workshops. This annual gala offers a fun environment in which to learn and experience new things and appreciate other cultures. Admission is good for the entire weekend: individuals $6, seniors 65+ $3, children 6-12 $3, family passes $15. www.vermontinternationalfestival.com(link is external), 802-863-6713. Christmas in WestonWeston, December 3, 2011, 11 am ‘ 4 pmAn old-fashioned Christmas festival! Tours, sleigh rides, Santa, caroling and more. Experience the Vermont Country Store, the Museum Mill, the Old Parish Church, and many other locations throughout Weston. Free. www.westonvt.com(link is external) or www.yourplaceinvermont.com(link is external), 802-228-5830. Coolidge Holiday Open HousePlymouth Notch, December 11, 2011, 10 am ‘ 4 pmEnjoy the traditions of the season at Plymouth Notch ‘ one of Vermont’s most picturesque villages. Visit the Coolidge Birthplace decorated as it would have been in 1872, the year the future president was born. Several other historic buildings are also open free of charge. www.historicvermont.org/coolidge(link is external), 802-672-3773. First Night BurlingtonBurlington, December 31, 2011, noon ‘ midnightFirst Night Burlington is Vermont’s largest one-day event, celebrating New Year’s Eve in downtown Burlington. This substance-free performing arts festival is in 20 different venues downtown and is fun for all ages! Adults $18, kids $5, family pack $39. www.firstnightburlington.com(link is external), 802-863-6005. 2012 Stowe Winter CarnivalStowe, January 16-29, 2012The 38th Annual Stowe Winter Carnival, ‘The Greatest Stowe on Earth,’ is a fourteen-day festival that takes place in the heart of quintessential Stowe, Vermont. The town comes alive in late January with a celebration of winter sports and the arts. Events such as the Snowgolf and Snowvolleyball Tournaments, Stowe Schuss Ski Race, and the 12th Annual Ice Carving Festival entice everyone to the outdoors! Free for spectators, some entry fees for participants. www.stowewintercarnival.com(link is external), 802-777-5510. Chester Winter CarnivalChester, February 17-19, 2012Fun for all ages! Events are guaranteed to get one outside for winter fun. Sled races, dog sled rides, skating outdoors and broom hockey warm one’s heart and evoke laughter on the coldest February days! Free admission. www.chester.govoffice.com(link is external) or www.yourplaceinvermont.com(link is external), 802-875-2693. 30th Annual U.s. Open SnowboardingStratton Mountain, March 4-11, 2012, 9 am ‘ 5 pmThe final stop of the Burton Global Open Series and the longest standing snowboarding event on the planet. Come watch as amateurs compete on the same platform as the world’s best riders including Vermont superstars Louie Vito, Hannah Teter, and 2011 defending champion Kelly Clark. Free. www.stratton.com(link is external), 800-STRATTON. Vermont Chili FestivalMiddlebury, March 10, 2012, 2 ‘ 4 pmWarm up with the Better Middlebury Partnership’s 4th Annual Vermont Chili Festival! Taste the best of the best from restaurants and caterers around the state, when they flock to historic downtown Middlebury. Cast your vote for the award-winning chili! The event includes activities for all ages. Adults $3, children under 12 $2. www.bettermiddleburypartnership.org(link is external), 802-388-4126. Green Mountain Film FestivalMontpelier, March 16-25, 2012Expect the best at the Green Mountain Film Festival – one won’t be disappointed. Powerful programming on a wide range of subjects, interesting and often unexpected guests, and a convivial atmosphere make this ten-day event an audience favorite. ‘I traveled the world without leaving Vermont,’ is frequent spectator sentiment. Admission fees vary. www.greenmountainfilmfestival.org(link is external), 802-262-3423.  The Vermont Chamber of Commerce, the largest statewide, private, not-for-profit business organization represents nearly every sector of the state’s corporate/hospitality community. Our mission is to create an economic climate conducive to business growth and the preservation of the Vermont quality of life.last_img read more


Animal Spirits

first_imgTatonka. The other day an acquaintance shared that she had recently noticed an unusual abundance of spiders in her life. All of a sudden, they seemed to be everywhere, climbing onto her body during yoga, getting stuck in her clothes and hair – in short, being a general nuisance. After overcoming her initial fear and repulsion, she began to view the creatures in another light, wondering about the reason for their sudden presence. Realizing that it’s not spider season in WNC, she came to the conclusion that the spider is her “power animal”. She began to look into myths and stories about these beings and subsequently drew some conclusions about the lessons she could learn from their sudden presence in her life.Which got me thinking – I need a power animal. I mean, how cool is that? The idea of an animal showing up in your life, that you might even view as somewhat pesty, actually being there for a reason. And that you might just learn something about yourself, about life, in the process.This obviously isn’t a new idea. Native cultures have long believed in the healing and guiding relationships between humans and animals, and shamans today continue to seek counsel from animal spirits. According to shamanic practice, each animal has something unique to offer, and unbeknownst to most humans, we each have a power animal that accompanies us throughout our lives, acting almost as a guardian angel. When we discover what this creature is, we can learn from its lessons and gifts.Obviously, some – okay, many – people consider this to be a bunch of New Age nonsense. Maybe it is – who am I to say? But I figure it can’t hurt to look into it a bit. Maybe I do have a power animal. If so, I’d hate to leave it hanging without checking out what it’s been trying to say to me.I think about the wild animals that have visited me lately. Is it the yearling bear that keeps hanging out in the backyard – or is he simply after the birdfeeder and compost bin? Maybe the buffaloes that seemed to follow us around last summer in Yellowstone. We nicknamed them the Three Amigos and got frustrated when they blocked traffic for hours on end. I hope it’s not the ants that invaded my pantry when I left a loaf of banana bread uncovered. Yes, that’s right – power animals can be insects. When I imagine my power animal, I picture something wild and free, a hawk soaring overhead, a bobcat darting through the forest. Not a common creepy-crawly that would typically warrant a call to the exterminator. I’m sorry, ants, but if you’re my power animals I’m going to have to call in a replacement. Call me shallow, but I need a power animal that can inspire.Failing to identify a power animal that’s made its presence known in my life, I decided to seek outside help in locating my spirit guide. I could enlist a shaman to help with this process, but since I don’t know any qualified spiritualists, I turned to the trusty internet. Turns out there are all sorts of nifty online ways of finding your animal, from quizzes to intuitive sites where you move your cursor over a peaceful scene and your animal appears.According to one on-line survey, my animal is the wolverine. Apparently I’m fearless, assertive, and tenacious. Nobody messes with wolverines. Not bad, but I’m not sure it fits, especially when I read on to learn that I would make a good Marine or middle linebacker. Onto the next quiz…The buffalo spirit. Once again, I’m described as strong-willed, even stubborn. I’m noticing a trend here. Apparently I’m also social and compassionate – I guess that could explain my career as a social worker. But the buffalo is described as laid back, which I could never claim to be. Again, this power animal doesn’t feel quite right for me.On the final try, I learned that I am fortunate to have the horse spirit within me. The horse promises to teach me how to balance my caring nature with my equally deep need for freedom and independence. She will help me to learn to relax fully into a peaceful and centered life, but will also help me to run like the wind and allow my soul to fly free when that’s what I need. Now we’re talking!Okay, so what do I do now that I have my power animal identified? I guess I look for the horse’s appearance in my life, searching for hidden messages. Or maybe doing this exercise was enough, helping me to become aware of both my strengths and the qualities that I wish to develop. How about you – which animal spirit speaks to you? Is it the stealthy jaguar, or the wise owl? Maybe the hummingbird, who symbolizes happiness. Next time you’re out in the woods, move quietly and pay attention to the creatures out there with you – who knows what message they may have to share?last_img read more


U.S. Marines and Sailors Make an Impact in Central America

first_imgBy U.S. Marine Corps Forces South Sergeant Melissa Martens November 14, 2017 Throughout their six-month deployment, U.S. marines and sailors with Special Purpose Marine Air-Ground Task Force – Southern Command (SPMAGTF-SC) have participated in the command volunteer program to offer their time and services to several countries in Central America. The command volunteer program was designed to create, track, and maximize volunteerism with the service members, and provide opportunities for them to make a difference in the local communities. “Working with the local population gave marines and sailors an opportunity to take advantage of every moment they had on this deployment,” said U.S. Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Keshia Powell, the religious program specialist with SPMAGTF-SC. “One of our missions was to build relationships with the host nation countries, so what better way to do that than investing time in their people.” Some of the opportunities the task force has participated in included volunteering at local orphanages, cleaning up parks, organizing soccer games in the community, and building homes with Habitat for Humanity. “Over 175 SPMAGTF-SC personnel have volunteered over 7,000 hours at 74 different projects throughout Central America,” said U.S. Navy Lieutenant Commander Christopher Stanfield, the SPMAGTF-SC chaplain. “These community relations events have greatly enhanced the host nation communities and partnerships, and were of significant personal value to individual service members.” For the marines and sailors, many of whom are experiencing their first time outside of the United States, interacting with the community firsthand provided ample opportunity for the task force to see the positive impact they can have on those around them. “Participating in these events gave us more insight and opened our eyes to seeing more than our everyday life,” said Lance Corporal Kaitlyn M. Erkson, intelligence specialist with the Aviation Combat Element, SPMAGTF-SC. “It was a humbling experience and it is something that I hope we will all take back with us and continue to do in our communities back home.” Building partner relations was a primary mission of SPMAGTF-SC. This included partnership not only with the host nations, but with their fellow service members in Joint Task Force – Bravo (JTF-Bravo), at Soto Cano Air Base in Honduras. Since 1997, service members from JTF-Bravo have supported more than 500 children at five different orphanages in Comayagua, Honduras. The opportunity for the marines and sailors of SPMAGTF-SC to integrate with them has greatly benefited the children and opened doors to more opportunities. “We are all here together working towards the same goal,” said U.S. Army Specialist Brittany R. Troha, religious affairs specialist with JTF-Bravo. “The people that we go visit and help will be the future. The partnership between the branches is a great way to shed light on teamwork, which is something we try to teach those we interact with.” Aside from interacting and developing strong bonds with local people, the service members have a unique opportunity to use their individual skills and talents to make a lasting imprint on those they serve. “Many of the marines and sailors on this deployment are reservists,” said Petty Officer 2nd Class Powell. “Because of this, many of the service members have different skill sets they use on the civilian side. For example, we have former English as a Second Language teachers, sports coaches and artists. These areas of expertise will benefit the people for years to come.” In addition to the community relations events, marines and sailors with SPMAGTF-SC completed engineering projects in Guatemala, Belize, and Honduras, as well as conducted security cooperation training with their counterparts in several other Central American and Caribbean nations. The unit also participated in humanitarian assistance and disaster relief efforts in the Caribbean Sea as part of Joint Task Force – Leeward Islands in response to hurricanes Irma and Maria.last_img read more


Person who attended church service in Endwell tests positive for virus

first_imgENDWELL (WBNG) — The Broome County Health Department is warning individuals that a person who attended a church service at Church of the Holy Family on Phyllis Street in Endwell has tested postiive for COVID-19. The department asks anyone who attended the church service on July 5 at 9:30 a.m. to self quarantine until July 19. Symptoms of COVID-19 include coughing, fever and shortness of breath.center_img For the most up to date information on the coronavirus in Broome County, click here.last_img