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Month: June 2021

Win tickets to Wales v Ireland

first_imgFor your chance to win, tell us the score when Wales met Ireland in the 2010 RBS 6 Nations. Email you entry to [email protected] before 2pm on Thursday 10 March. You must include a daytime telephone number and your full address – both are conditions of entry as is a commitment not to sell the tickets on, even at face value.To register your rugby club for the RBS RugbyForce Weekend on 11 & 12 June, visit www.rbs.co.uk/rugbyforce Both Wales and Ireland – with only one defeat apiece – are still in the hunt for the RBS 6 Nations Championship this year and you can be at the Millennium Stadium this Saturday to see both sides in what promises to be a titanic clash between two sides who have both won Grand Slams in the last three years.But, as rugby fans will know, almost every player on the international stage started at a local club. Championship sponsor is recognising this by helping local communities to make their rugby club a better place. RBS RugbyForce helps clubs to improve their facilities through on-line tools, practical advice and a few incentives.To further recognise how important communities and fans are to the success of the international game, RBS has teamed up with Rugby World to offer a pairof tickets to Wales v Ireland, 12th March LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more


Barbarians v Australia – preview

first_img11 Bryan Habana11. Digby Ioane 10 Danny Cipriani10. James O’Connor *Last minute change for the Wallabies – Dave Dennis in for Ben McCalman 17 Salvatore Perugini17. Ben Alexander 3  Sylvain Marconnet6. Scott Higginbotham 12 Stirling Mortlock12. Berrick Barnes 19 Marco Bortolami19. Dave Dennis In at the deep end: Sam Tomkins will make his union debut against the world’s second-best nationYou never know what to expect when the Barbarians come to town – but this weekend’s Killik Cup clash against Australia at Twickenham contains more uncertainties than usual, writes Alan Pearey.1. Foremost among them is the presence of England rugby league full-back Sam Tomkins, whose first game of union will entail marking Digby Ioane! Tomkins is 22 and set league alight when scoring five tries on his debut for Wigan Warriors in 2008. “Sam’s selection underlines that imitation really is the sincerest form of flattery,” said Nigel Wood, the RFL’s chief executive. Bit cocky that! He looks a special talent but surely this union rookie will be exposed against a back-line as sharp as the Aussies?2. The battle of the tens will be fascinating. Danny Cipriani of the Melbourne Rebels returns to Twickenham without the same baggage of expectation weighing him down when he quit English rugby. And with Quade Cooper injured, 36-cap James O’Connor makes a first Test start as a fly-half. He’s a wing or full-back normally, is earmarked as a future inside-centre, and will probably pass his fly-half test with flying colours – he’s sheer class.3.  Like Tomkins, Baa-Baas centre Robbie Fruean is uncapped and at 23 his time to state his case for an All Black shirt has come. Fruean is a former IRB U19 Player of the Year who was struck by illness and needed open-heart surgery. If he and Mortlock don’t cancel out Horne and Barnes it will only be because as a pairing they’ve had almost no time to practise – which of course is the Barbarians’ perpetual problem.4. Will the World Cup-winning All Blacks play like champs or chumps? Keven Mealamu, Jerome Kaino, Adam Thomson and Isaia Toea are in the Baa-Baas starting XV and history shows it can be difficult to get back into one’s stride after World Cup celebrations. Unless they stayed off the booze…5. No such issue for Barbarians skipper Victor Matfield, who at 34 will bow out of international rugby after 110 South Africa caps. What a forward he’s been and still is. “He’s a wonderful player and you can see why when you get up close. It’s been a pleasure to work with him,” said Steve Hansen, who’s coaching the Baa-Baas with Graham Henry.The Barbarians have beaten New Zealand and South Africa in recent years but I expect the Wallabies to do a number on them. 18 Jason White18. James Horwill Australia 5  Victor Matfield (C)4. Rob Simmons 21 Richard Kahui21. Nick Phipps LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS 8  Adam Thomson1. James Slipper 9  Peter Stringer9. Will Genia 1  Eusebio Guinazu8. Dave Dennis Replacements:Replacements: LONDON, ENGLAND – NOVEMBER 23: Sam Tomkins of the Barbarians runs with the ball as Robbie Fruean (L) looks on during the Barbarians Training Session at Latymer Upper School on November 23, 2011 in London, England. (Photo by David Rogers/Getty Images) 14 Sam Tomkins14. Lachie Turner 13 Robbie Fruean13. Rob Horne 6  Jerome Kaino3. Salesi Ma’afu 4  Simon Shaw5. Nathan Sharpe Starting XV: 16 Adriaan Strauss16. Stephen Moore 2  Keven Mealamu7. David Pocock Barbarians 15 Isaia Toeva15. Adam Ashley-Cooper Starting XV 20 Nemia Kenatale20. Matt Hodgson 7  Mauro Bergamasco2. Tatafu Polota Nau 22 Seru Rabeni22. Ben Tapuailast_img read more


Rugby World Cup memories: Danny Care

first_img Sheer delight: can Danny Care help England achieve World Cup victory in 2015? Danny Care has been designing his ideal hotel guest room for Marriott Hotels, and you can see what he’s come up with at travelbrilliantly.co.uk/guestroom. You can vote for your favourite elements on the site – he’s up against four other designers – plus tell him what you think of his design by tweeting using #brilliantguestroom! The Rugby World Cup has provided some of the greatest rugby memories in the history books. We asked the England and Harlequins scrum-half for five moments that stand out… Up close and personal: France prepare to shatter All Black dreams in 2007Billy Whizz’s dancing feet – 2003 “Jason Robinson was the best finisher in the world at that time, and that try when he gets up and punches the ball set the tone for England.“I’ve played against him a few times, and he was always a very difficult opponent. In my first year as a pro, when I was playing for Leeds, Jason broke the line, and though there were only a few metres either side of me and I didn’t lay a finger on him. The photo in the paper the following day was just that – him running past and me lying on the ground with ‘9 Care’ on my back in full view!”Skinned: Care is left in Robinson’s dust during a Sale v Leeds battleBen Kay’s butter fingers – 2003“I’ll drop Ben Kay in it with my last one – when he dropped the ball over the line. It was an unbelievable moment, and one that everyone has had. But not many people have had it in a World Cup final!“It’s always funny to watch a moment like that. You know everyone’s been there before, whether it’s in junior rugby, youth rugby, or playing for England. So you have an amount of sympathy – but you can still have a bit of a chuckle!”Moment to forget: Ben Kay doesn’t quite get the ball down in the 2003 final! France shock the All Blacks – 2007 “It was a pretty amazing win by France in Cardiff. New Zealand were tipped to go all the way, but a little bit of magic and some hard work saw France pull off an unbelievable result. It just shows how good France are on their day.“That World Cup was during my first or second year down at Quins and I was just breaking into the first team. My mates, like Nick Easter, were there playing for England. It was pretty heartbreaking for them to lose in the final – they could’ve won the World Cup for a second consecutive time – but it wasn’t to be that year.” Jonny makes history – 2003“I have to start with Jonny Wilkinson’s drop-goal,” says Care. “It’s the ultimate memory for any English rugby fan, that right-footed drop-goal. The way they controlled the game at the end was incredible, with (Matt) Dawson sniping for an extra 20 metres, (Martin) Johnson getting into the perfect position and Jonny doing the rest. Our coach, Mike Catt, kicked the ball out at the end, and the whole team showed real composure.“I was sat at home with my best mate and my dad. I was quite young back then, about 16, so we weren’t on the beers. We had a few bacon sandwiches though, and I just remember dreaming of playing for England myself one day.”Injury and heartbreak – 2011 “The second memory that stands out in my mind is when I got injured and was ruled out of the 2011 tournament,” (Danny sustained a toe injury). “The squad had been picked, and I then got injured just two weeks before we were due to go to New Zealand. It was devastating.“I did get to do some stuff with ITV, though, and so I got involved with the tournament and watched it closely as a fan. It was weird seeing the boys out there, having been so involved in the training camps, and it was hard to watch them play, especially because the lads didn’t do as well as they could’ve done. The off-field stuff didn’t go in their favour, either, but I still would’ve given anything to have been out there.” LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more


John Smit picks his top five hookers

first_imgSpringbok World Cup winner John Smit takes time out to name the five toughest opponents he ever faced on the field TAGS: Highlight John Smit played in three World Cups, winning 111 caps for South Africa and lifting the 2007 trophy after defeating England in the final in Paris. After two years in the UK with Saracens, he returned to South Africa where he is currently CEO of the Sharks. Here he talks about the five toughest hookers he ever played with or against in a distinguished careerKeven Mealamu, New Zealand (126 caps)“The toughest bastard out there has to be Keven Mealamu. The harder you went at him, the harder he came back at you. He was totally fearless. You almost had to guage how you played against him. There was nothing you could do that would make him go away. He was nuggety and just kept on going. He would run through walls for the All Blacks and what’s more amazing is he’s my age (36) and he’s still going, now into this fourth World Cup. I have an incredible amount of respect for Kev. A phenomenal player.”Tough nut: Keven Mealamu wasn’t the biggest but he was the hardest Smit opponentKeith Wood, Ireland (63 caps, incl 5 for Lions)“When I was just starting out at hooker, I played against Keith (Wood) in Dublin. Let’s just say he gave me a good schooling. He pulled out every trick in the book to show the youngster who was boss. I took on board everything I was on the end of and put it into my armoury. Woody was a phenomenal player. He was a strong leader and a superb thrower of the ball – I think there was a time when he didn’t missed a lineout in two years. When he’d peel around from the lineout and come at you, you certainly knew about it. He was fiery to play against but a player you’d love to have on your side and a good bloke off the field.”Inspirational: An experienced Keith Wood gave Smit a schooling in the front rowSteve Thompson, England (76 caps, inc 3 for Lions)“I had quite a few tussles with Steve Thompson. He was in a similar physical mould to me, over 120kgs and we had some fantastic clashes up front. He played in a time where South Africa didn’t have much luck against England and I normally ended up on the losing side against him. The England pack back then were an abrasive bunch which I quite liked. The Springboks learnt a lot of lessons from them. As well as the set-piece, he was a decent hooker in the loose and liked to carry the ball. Like many great hookers, he played like an auxiliary flanker.” LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img Mobile: Steve Thompson was part of an abrasive England pack that taugh Smit lessonsBismarck du Plessis, South Africa (73 caps)“I played with Bismarck for two years around 2009 and 2010. His workrate, tenacity and physical edge is incredible. He was playing so well, I was moved to tighthead just to accommodate him. I remember playing with him in Hamilton against the All Blacks and I’ve never seen anyone work as hard or exert such a physical influence in 80 minutes. We’ve all seen what he can do. He’s like a loose forward; he steals ball, throws and scrummages unbelievably well. Of course there was rivalry between us, but he was also respectful. I’d like to say I took him under my wing and taught him everything I knew. There’s a big part of me that is proud of how he plays. I saw him only recently. We have a great relationship.”Unit: Bismarck du Plessis has an all-round game at No 2 in Smit’s eyesChris Roussow, South Africa (9 caps)“Chris was the Springboks hooker in our World Cup win in 1995, so I respected him from the off. I started out as tighthead prop and was just a youngster. At the time I didn’t know I was learning, but Chris would spend time with me and look out for me so I could survive. He used all the little tricks only front rows would know – believe me, I could spend hours telling you! I picked these things up and passed them down to help tightheads I played with. He was a lovely bloke.”Rugby Legends: John Smit (far left) in London and ready for the World CupJohn Smit will feature on the Heineken Rugby Studio during RWC 2015. Get closer to the action @heineken, #ItsYourCall. For more info visit heineken.com/rugby. Magic moment: Springbok captain John Smit lifted the World Cup in 2007 last_img read more


Autumn Internationals Wales v South Africa Preview

first_imgAll you need to know about the Test between Wales and South Africa in Cardiff. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Autumn Internationals Wales v South Africa PreviewBoth these teams are trending in the same upward trajectory it seems. Wales are on an unbeaten run of eight Tests and are looking to secure an Autumn Internationals clean sweep for the first time.South Africa, after a couple of tough years, are playing excellent rugby once again as shown by their narrow victories over Scotland and France this November, and a victory over New Zealand in the Rugby Championship earlier this year.Both sides will be looking to end their years with one more hard-fought win and we expect this to be a close affair given the past few score-lines between the two rugby powerhouses. In recent memory, Wales have won the last three matches, with the latest in Washington DC in the summer. However that was Rassie Erasmus’s first game in charge, so the Springboks taking the field on Saturday will be a totally different proposition for the Welsh.As a result, this Test is sure to be a colossal match-up between two sides looking to take momentum into World Cup year.What’s the big team news?Wales have made several changes to the side that, for a brief period, were thoroughly tested by Tonga.In fact Adam Beard and Liam Williams are the only two players to keep their spots, with the latter taking up the full-back jersey due to the concussion to Leigh Halfpenny. Will Halfpenny’s kicking proficiency be missed in a tight contest? Gareth Anscombe starts at ten, with Dan Biggar on the bench.Out of Action: Will Leigh Halfpenny be missed? (Getty Images)South Africa on the other hand have named an unchanged starting line-up a week after beating Scotland at Murrayfield. The only change to the match day squad comes in the form of the giant Eben Etzebeth who replaces Lood de Jager on the bench.What have the coaches said?Warren Gatland said of the possibility of a Autumn Internationals clean sweep: “The players are fully aware of what they’ve achieved and they can do something special.“Momentum would be created for the Six Nations and they can continue to build towards the World Cup.“I haven’t seen this level of maturity in a group of players. We’re calm and our composure in games has been outstanding.“We want to end the campaign with a big performance against a very good South African side. It’s the end of a campaign, like a cup game. Winner takes all.”Springboks head-coach Rassie Erasmus said” “Wales have a formidable squad and their current run of eight unbeaten Tests is proof and also an indication of their good form at the moment. “They are a well-balanced and strong side with a great home record so our boys will be in for a massive contest on Saturday.“We will be desperate to win, and to end the tour on a high would be fantastic for the experience and growth of this squad.”Man Mountain: Etzebeth returns to the match day squad after an injury picked up against England (Getty Images)Any interesting statistics?Five of the past six meetings between the two sides have been settled by six points or fewer.Wales last won nine in a row in 1999 – when backs coach Rob Howley was captain.They have won their past seven Tests at home. Only once since 1978 have they enjoyed a longer winning run.South Africa’s tally of 36 tries this year puts them third among tier one nations behind New Zealand (68) and Scotland (39).The 26-20 win against Scotland last weekend was just their sixth win in their past 19 Tests on their travels (D1, L12).What time does it kick off and is it on TV?Wales v South Africa, Saturday 24 November, Principality Stadium, CardiffThe match will kick off at 5.20pm and will be televised on the BBC, S4C and the BBC Sport website.Luke Pearce will be the referee in control with Wayne Barnes and Karl Dickson providing assistance as touch judges.The TMO is  Irishman Simon McDowell.What are the line-ups?WALES: Liam Williams; George North, Jonathan Davies, Hadleigh Parkes, Josh Adams; Gareth Anscombe, Gareth Davies; Nicky Smith, Ken Owens, Tomas Francis, Adam Beard, Alun Wyn Jones, Dan Lydiate, Justin Tipuric, Ross Moriarty.Replacements: Elliot Dee, Rob Evans, Dillon Lewis, Cory Hill, Ellis Jenkins, Tomos Williams, Dan Biggar, Owen Watkin.SOUTH AFRICA: Willie le Roux; Sbu Nkosi, Jesse Kriel, Damian de Allende, Aphiwe Dyantyi; Handré Pollard, Embrose Papier; Steven Kitshoff, Malcolm Marx, Frans Malherbe, RG Snyman, Franco Mostert, Siya Kolisi (c), Pieter-Steph du Toit, Duane Vermeulen.center_img Replacements: Bongi Mbonambi, Thomas du Toit, Vincent Koch, Eben Etzebeth, Francois Louw, Ivan van Zyl, Elton Jantjies, Cheslin Kolbe.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Different Breed: Wales will face a very different Springboks side to the one they faced in Washington earlier this year (Getty Images) last_img read more


2019 Rugby World Cup Outsiders

first_img 2019 Rugby World Cup Favourites Past Rugby World Cup Hosts Expand We take a look at the two teams… We take a look at the past countries… Rugby World Cup Winners 2019 Rugby World Cup OutsidersThe Rugby World Cup is usually won by one of the favourites going into the tournament, however, sometimes there are teams that shock the rugby world and get a long way, or get further than most were expecting.Canada getting out of the group in 1991 and Scotland getting to the semi-finals at the same tournament spring to mind. Back in 2007 Argentina coming third and beating the hosts, France, twice in dramatic fashion was very unexpected.In fact the French have caught a lot of people off-guard a lot of the time, getting further than we all predicted.Past tournaments have proven that outsiders occasionally do well in the World Cup so we have put together a short list of teams who aren’t favourites to win it all, but could do well in the tournament. The four teams below may not be at the top of peoples lists of contenders, but they definitely have the firepower and talent to get a long way.AustraliaIt is probably a cliche to say that the Wallabies always find a way of raising their games for the Rugby World Cup, but their record speaks for itself. In 2019 they are most definitely not one of the favourites to win the trophy despite their recent victory over the All Blacks. No, the team is way too inconsistent and there are questions marks hanging over them in several ways. However they have plenty of players who have been deep into World Cups before and they definitely have a team capable of making some noise in Japan.Scotland 2019 Rugby World Cup Favourites Unpredictable: France are definitely an outsider to do well in Japan (Getty Images) We look at some teams who are not favourites to win the tournament but definitely have the ability to do so. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Rugby World Cup Winners We take a quick tour through the history… Past Rugby World Cup Hosts On their day, Scotland can beat absolutely anyone but that day only ever comes around when Finn Russell is on form. If he is not playing well then the side often struggles but if he is on form then watch out. This reliance on Russell and his inconsistency is exactly why Gregor Townsend’s team is not one of the favourites.In short they are a team that has to be respected, but catch them on a bad day and they could easily ship 30 points quickly.ArgentinaOver the past few years Argentina have slowly but surely built a very solid team. Playing in the Rugby Championship against the All Blacks, Wallabies and Springboks regularly has clearly led to improvement but can they go all the way in 2019? Probably not but if their is one team that perfectly symbolises the idea of an outsider, it is the men in blue and white. Also make sure you know about the Groups, Warm-ups, Dates, Fixtures, Venues, TV Coverage, Qualified Teams by clicking on the highlighted links.Finally, don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Expand Collapse FranceAs per usual, no one has any real clue what version of France will turn up in Japan and how far they will go. One minute they can be embarrassingly awful and the next they can look as if they are utterly unbeatable. For example during the 2019 Six Nations they got utterly smashed by the English before beating Scotland a week later. At the Rugby World Cup, they just seem to have a knack of causing serious uncertainty in their opponents and that could lead to some surprising results in Japan.Follow our Rugby World Cup homepage which we update regularly with news and features.last_img read more


Alabama seats 11th bishop

first_img Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Featured Jobs & Calls Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Martinsville, VA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Tags Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Submit an Event Listing Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA People Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Press Release Service Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Director of Music Morristown, NJ House of Bishops, Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Featured Events Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Curate Diocese of Nebraska Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY By ENS staffPosted Jan 9, 2012 center_img Youth Minister Lorton, VA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Collierville, TN Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Washington, DC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Shreveport, LA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Albany, NY Bishop Consecrations, Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit a Job Listing The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit a Press Release Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Belleville, IL The Rt. Rev. Henry N. Parsley Jr., right, 10th bishop of Alabama, presents the Rt. Rev. John McKee Sloan with the symbol of office, a silver-tipped crozier first carried by Alabama Bishop Richard Hooker Wilmer in the 19th century. Photo/Diocese of Alabama[Episcopal News Service] The Rt. Rev. John McKee Sloan was seated Jan. 7 as 11th bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Alabama.The service for Sloan, who had been the bishop suffragan of the diocese since 2008, took place at the Cathedral Church of the Advent in Birmingham.Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori officiated at the service. She had also been Sloan’s chief consecrator in 2008.The Rt. Rev. Henry N. Parsley Jr., 10th bishop of Alabama, presented Sloan with the symbol of office, a silver-tipped crozier first carried by Alabama Bishop Richard Hooker Wilmer in the 19th century.Diocese of Mississippi Bishop Duncan Gray preached and jokingly called Sloan, originally from Mississippi, a missionary to Alabama who “went native.”Noting Sloan’s reputation as a storyteller, in the tradition of so many Mississippi authors, he called upon Sloan to continue telling the story of Christ and his people: “Who we are, where we come from, and what we are called to become.”“Continue to tell the stories of human foibles and God’s holy and mysterious grace,” he concluded, according to a diocesan story about the service. “Tell the stories, my brother, so that the Word becomes flesh and dwells among us.”The reader of the Old Testament Lesson was Zach Woolley, who has been a camper and a staff member of Special Session at Alabama’s Camp McDowell. The Special Session program, which Sloan inaugurated and continues to co-direct, is designed for summer campers with mental and physical disabilities.Alleen Cater, who directed the Transition Committee, read the New Testament lesson.The liturgy opened with preludes for organ and brass under the direction of Dr. Stephen G. Schaeffer, the cathedral’s music director and organist. The cathedral choir sang anthems, including a solo by Amberlyn Richardson on “Prayer of the Venerable Bede” by Richard Proulx.Twenty-five Episcopal Church bishops, in Sloan’s words, “from Maine to Oklahoma and everywhere in between,” participated. Also attending were dignitaries from area churches, including the Presbyterian, Roman Catholic, Greek Orthodox, Evangelical Lutheran Church, AME Zion and Christian Methodist Episcopal denominations; rabbis from area synagogues; and Birmingham Mayor William A. Bell Sr.Jefferts Schori spent the afternoon after the service with visitors at Trinity Commons, the home of Episcopal campus ministries in Birmingham.On Friday, she met with health and medical researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. “It was a fascinating conversation,” she told diocesan clergy at a luncheon that day, according to the diocesan news story. She said their 90-minute conversation focused on “the interface of their science and their faith.”She said the discussion touched on faith in issues of death and dying. She was especially struck, she said, by questions raised about the legacy of racism in medical research and how it affects the recruitment of African Americans in clinical research trials.Sloan, 56, has been bishop suffragan of Alabama since 2008. He was elected bishop diocesan in July 2011. He is the former rector of St. Thomas Church in Huntsville, and before that served churches in his native Mississippi. He is also a member of the Episcopal Church’s Standing Commission on Liturgy and Music. He is married to the former Tina Marie Brown. Their children, Mary Nell and McKee, led the recitation of the Psalm in the service.The Diocese of Alabama includes 34,000 members in 90 congregations, covering north and central Alabama and the Black Belt region. The diocese has three campus ministry centers and eight campus chaplains. The diocese has established 11 new Episcopal churches since 1990. It is active in a number of ministries of outreach including significant work in Haiti.Links to photo and video coverage of the Jan. 7 event is available at the end of the diocesan news story here. Alabama seats 11th bishop Rector Bath, NC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Tampa, FL Rector Smithfield, NClast_img read more


Egypt forms first ever Council of Churches

first_img Press Release Service Youth Minister Lorton, VA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Tampa, FL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Albany, NY Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Ecumenical & Interreligious, Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Egypt forms first ever Council of Churches Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Bath, NC Rector Knoxville, TN Anglican Communion, Rector Collierville, TN Submit a Press Release Associate Rector Columbus, GA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Featured Jobs & Calls The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA center_img Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Middle East Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ By Bellah ZuluPosted Mar 18, 2013 Rector Shreveport, LA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Smithfield, NC Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Featured Events Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Belleville, IL Rector Pittsburgh, PA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Tags Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK [Anglican Communion News Service] Five different churches in Egypt — including the Coptic Orthodox Church, the Roman Catholic Church, the Evangelical (Presbyterian) Church, the Greek Orthodox Church and the Anglican Church — have joined together to form the Egypt Council of Churches after one year of deliberations and meetings between the churches.The announcement was made in a press release by the Most Rev. Dr. Mouneer Hanna Anis, bishop of the Diocese of Egypt with North Africa and the Horn of Africa, and primate of the Province of Jerusalem and the Middle East.“It is so important that this council is born at this time while Egypt is going through a very challenging circumstance politically, socially and economically,” he said. “It means a lot for the churches to face these challenges together with one heart and soul.”The launch of the council took place on Feb. 18 and was hosted by His Holiness Pope Tawadros II of the Coptic Orthodox Church, known as the “Mother” church of Egypt.“The first goal of the Egypt Council of Churches is to enhance the bonds of love and the spirit of co-operation among the member churches,” explained Anis. “There are 15 different committees that will be active in the areas of faith and unity, youth, Sunday schools, community development and women among others.”The primate acknowledged the importance of such collaboration among churches. “Each church in this council will enrich the others with its heritage,” he said. “It is important to affirm the principle of inter-dependence of each church.”FULL STATEMENT BELOWOn Monday 18 February 2013, the Egypt Council of Churches was launched!  After one year of meetings and much discussion, five churches joined together to form the Egypt Council of Churches: the Coptic Orthodox Church, the Catholic Church, the Evangelical (Presbyterian) Church, the Greek Orthodox Church and the Anglican Church.  His Holiness, Pope Tawadros II of the Coptic Orthodox Church, the “Mother” church of Egypt, hosted the launch of this council.The Most Rev. Dr. Mouneer Hanna Anis, Bishop of the Diocese of Egypt with North Africa and the Horn of Africa, and Primate of the Province of Jerusalem and the Middle East said, “It is so important that this council is born at this time while Egypt is going through a very challenging circumstance politically, socially and economically. It means a lot for the churches to face these challenges together with one heart and soul.”  Bishop Mouneer went on to say that “the first goal of the Egypt Council of Churches is to enhance the bonds of love and the spirit of cooperation among the member churches.”There are 15 different committees that will be active in the areas of faith and unity, youth, Sunday schools, community development and women, etc…  Bishop Mouneer said at the launch of the Egypt Council of Churches, “that each church in this council will enrich the others with its heritage.”  He also said that “it is important to affirm the principle of inter-dependence of each church.”The Most Rev. Dr. Mouneer Hanna AnisBishop of the Episcopal / Anglican Diocese of Egypt with North Africa and the Horn of AfricaPresident Bishop of the Episcopal / Anglican Province of Jerusalem and the Middle East Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Bishop Diocesan Springfield, ILlast_img read more


Archbishop of Canterbury’s Christmas sermon

first_img Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books john Neir says: Comments (4) Julian Malakar says: The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group December 27, 2013 at 5:16 pm Christmas is “God with us”. When God is with us neither poverty nor social and political injustice could break our spirit. May Almighty God opens hearts of those who prosecute disciples of Christ because of believing Christ and let the light of Christ shine through their darken hearts as it was happened to Saul of Tarsus (Saint Paul) who killed 1st Christians. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit an Event Listing An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET December 27, 2013 at 8:58 am Very nice sermon by our Church leader. Spoke about the meaning of Christmas and spoke to both the heart & mind. Archbishop of Canterbury Submit a Job Listing Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Featured Events Stewart David Wigdor says: Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Featured Jobs & Calls [Anglican Communion News Service] Isaiah looks forward to God rescuing His people, instantly recognisable, leading them in victory. Hebrews looks back at the great line of prophets and says this arrival is the climax to the whole of history. John starts with those words that send shudders up the spine, consciously echoing Genesis, “in the beginning ……. ”And what do we get? A few pounds [kilos] of crying baby. Shepherds clump in and mutter approvingly at his size, or health, or shape of his nose, or whatever banal things we try and find to say when we meet a baby (Winston Churchill is reputed to have said when told that a grandchild looked like him “all babies look like me”). When God assumes flesh he does not take power, but vulnerability, need, dependence. God the baby is so small that he leaves room for all of us to ignore Him, to glance and pass on. The heart and origin of creation is easily overlooked. This is less Big Bang than faint cry. RS Thomas wrote[1]:“The moon is bornAnd a child is born,lying among white clothesas the moon among clouds.They both shine, butthe light from the oneis abroad in the universeas among broken glass.”God was born fully human. The witnesses are shepherds and magi, John the Baptist, the gospel writers and hosts of Christians through the centuries, in their lives and their deaths, in words and deeds. A witness of this birth is not like a witness of comet or an asteroid, which is seen and noted, but which has little or no effect on the one that sees it. If we respond, this small baby God that gives us so much space to ignore fills our whole world, changes what we see when we look, catches us up and takes us with him in life, through death and into all eternity. Belief, putting ourselves and trusting our lives into the power of this child, the man he became, the crucified saviour, the risen and ascended Christ, enables us to become children of God, our whole being changed.God’s way of being human shows us what being human means. According to the gospel of Jesus Christ to be human means being vulnerable, not safe. Our pride is humbled by God needing swaddling. Our wisdom is confounded by the foolishness of God’s baby cries. Love is demonstrated not by grasping power but by lowering yourself so you can raise the fallen.  The humility of God provokes us to seek to awaken what is best, in every person we meet, every group that we encounter[2].God’s vulnerability is seen in overwhelming self giving. When as individuals or societies we grab for power, compete for resources and neglect the weakest and most vulnerable amongst us we neglect Christ himself. Where people are measured in their worth only by what they can produce, what economic value they have, then Christ is denied and our own humanity corrupted.The great ikons of Christ for us are all those of vulnerability; a baby, a man dying abandoned on a cross, bread and wine that can be crushed and spilt. Yet from the  vulnerability we get life complete, eternal.The vulnerable God was born into a world that rejected him, and yet he loved it without limits. As we look around our world at injustice and conflict he calls us to His pattern of love: we see victims and perpetrators, and in loving them without limits we imitate Christ and challenge every injustice and any demeaning of human beings.Today, singing of Bethlehem, we see injustices in Palestine and Israel, where land is taken or rockets are fired, and the innocent suffer.We see injustice in the ever more seriously threatened Christian communities of the Middle East. The Prince of Wales highlighted their plight last week. Even this morning a church in Baghdad, where there have been Christians since the 1st century, was bombed and 15 more people testified to their faith with their lives. Christians in the region are attacked and massacred, driven into exile from an area  in which their presence has always been central, undoubted, essential, richly contributing, faithful.We see injustice in South Sudan, where political ambitions have led towards ethnic conflict. On Saturday I was speaking to a Bishop under siege, in a compound full of the dying. God’s passionate love for the vulnerable is found in the baby in a manger in a country at war. If that was His home, today it must be our care.We see injustices at home. Even in a recovering economy, Christians, the servants of a vulnerable and poor Saviour, need to act to serve and love the poor: they need also to challenge the causes of poverty. Prospect magazine had a poll this month that suggested the church is more trusted on politics than religion. But the two cannot be separated. Christ’s birth is not politics, it is love expressed. Our response is not political, but love delivered in hope. The action of the churches in the last five years is extraordinary, reaching out in ways not seen since 1945. Yet no society can be content where misery and want exist, unless through our love collectively we also challenge the greed and selfishness behind it.We will speak and act best when we are caught up in following the vulnerable God as His disciples in His way. Then His love fills us, His compassion drives us on, compassion for every person, at every point of life or wealth or power. When individual Christians and the church together believe, and act on that belief, every human attitude is challenged, especially about the poor, and the world changes.We follow the God who is Saviour, whose word of love was found in action and word. We are called to act, whether at home or around the world, not just lament. Jesus rescues us from our brokenness and makes us carriers of life and light. He  calls for that great line of witnesses that has swept down through the centuries to be continued today by a church that is confident in the message of God’s love and truth. It will always be an untidy church because we are in a vulnerable, untidy, broken world. Yet when we see the fact of Christ’s birth, hear the witnesses, receive the life he gives and respond in passionate discipleship then all our vulnerabilities, muddles and weaknesses are carried in His strength. The Christian meaning of Christmas is unconditional love received, love overflowing into a frequently love-lost world. Archbishop of Canterbury’s Christmas sermon Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Shreveport, LA Jay Woods says: Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL December 31, 2013 at 1:48 pm I just wanted to share thoughts with all Episcopalians: first that God is Infinite yet man is finite. Still God exists within man. How can the Infinite God be in us? There is a Perfect Master.Second all we see and percieve in this world is an illusion. The only reality is the Lord and you the individual. And all is Love. Love thus must have its own world…. the Kingdom of Heaven.Finally doing good works is to glorify God but entering Heaven is only by the Love of God as Lord Jesus Christ. This sharing should bring us great joy. We can rejoice that the Knowledge of God reveals Jesus in the most incredible way. His own hope to join Him. And we to seek Heaven on earth. Happy New Year. Rector Martinsville, VA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Tags Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Comments are closed. Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Posted Dec 25, 2013 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK [1] Nativity, Collected Poems 1945-1990, page 508, ISBN 1-85799-354-3 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Curate Diocese of Nebraska TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit a Press Release December 26, 2013 at 4:50 pm O God, give our Church a leader like Pope Francis who speaks to the heart: to the whole person. Amen. [2] Thoughts drawn out of a letter from Pere Nicolas Buttet, 3 December, 2013. Anglican Communion, Press Release Service Rector Washington, DC Rector Belleville, IL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Bath, NC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Tampa, FL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Albany, NY last_img read more


Peregrinos investigan sobre los refugiados y el proceso de reasentamiento…

first_img Youth Minister Lorton, VA Peregrinos investigan sobre los refugiados y el proceso de reasentamiento en Ruanda y Kenia Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Press Release Service Tags Episcopal Migration Ministries, Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Advocacy Peace & Justice, Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Smithfield, NC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Shreveport, LA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Anglican Communion, Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Rector Albany, NY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Immigration, Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Africa, Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York center_img Rector Belleville, IL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Washington, DC Featured Events AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Collierville, TN Refugees Migration & Resettlement Submit an Event Listing Por Lynette Wilson Posted Apr 9, 2015 Rector Martinsville, VA El campamento de refugiados de Gihembe alberga a 14.500 refugiados congoleses que han buscado refugio en Ruanda. Foto de Lynette Wilson/ENS.[Episcopal News Service] A poco más de una hora en auto en las afueras de Kigali, la capital de Ruanda, 14.500 congoleses viven encima de una loma y en su falda en chozas de barro colorado, enclavadas en el interior del país, lejos de la provincia de Kivu Norte, de la República Democrática del Congo, de donde la mayoría de ellos huyó del conflicto armado y de la violencia a mediados de los años 90.El campamento de refugiados de Gihembe se estableció en 1997 luego que milicias armadas masacraran a refugiados congoleses que habían encontrado albergue en un campamento de refugiados en el noroeste de Ruanda. Muchos residentes han pasado tal vez dos décadas en Gihembe, uno de los cinco campamentos de refugiados en Ruanda que atiende a 74.000 de ellos, más de la mitad menores de 18 años.Desde 1998, más de 5,5 millones de personas han muerto en el Congo debido a la violencia armada, las enfermedades y la desnutrición; 2,5 millones se han visto desplazadas internamente y unos 500.000 han huido del largo conflicto del país, la vasta mayoría de los cuales vive en campamentos de refugiados en las regiones de los Grandes Lagos y en el Cuerno de África. Los refugiados congoleses constituyen la sexta población de refugiados del mundo y el 18 por ciento del total de los refugiados de África.De los más de 500.000 refugiados congoleses en la región, se estima que 160.000 cumplen las condiciones para optar por un reasentamiento, según el Alto Comisionado de las Naciones Unidas para los Refugiados (UNHCR, por su sigla en inglés).Dado el número, lo mucho que ha durado el conflicto y el que no haya ninguna señal de paz, el UNHCR y sus asociados han priorizado en los últimos años el reasentamiento de los refugiados congoleses. El objetivo es 50.000 para 2017 —de los cuales el 80 por ciento estaría destinado a venir a Estados Unidos.Paul Kenya, funcionario para el reasentamiento de la UNHCR en Ruanda; Deborah Stein, directora del Ministerio Episcopal de Migración y peregrinos de #ShareTheJourney escuchan al Dr. Pascal Kalinda Murego hablar acerca de la salud de los refugiados y de los servicios de salud que se ofrecen en el campamento de Gihembe. Foto de Lynette Wilson/ENS.A principios de marzo, ocho episcopales participaron en una peregrinación del grupo #ShareTheJourney auspiciado por la Sociedad Misionera Nacional y Extranjera (DFMS) a la región de los Grandes Lagos de África y visitaron Gihembe para imponerse de las dificultades de los refugiados congoleses y del Programa de Estados Unidos para la Admisión de Refugiados.La DFMS [Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society] es el nombre con el cual la Iglesia Episcopal está incorporada, funciona empresarialmente y lleva a cabo la misión.“El propósito”, dijo Deborah Stein, directora del Ministerio Episcopal de Migración, el servicio de reasentamiento de refugiados de la DFMS, era “mostrar la Iglesia Episcopal a través de las lentes de los refugiados congoleses que están destinados al reasentamiento, cómo funciona ese reasentamiento desde el principio hasta la llegada a EE.UU.Fue también una oportunidad de inspirar a los peregrinos a convertirse en promotores de los refugiados, añadió Stein.La peregrinación del 2 al 13 de marzo, incluyó escalas en Kenia y Ruanda, donde, además de visitar el campamento, los peregrinos se reunieron con representantes y funcionarios de reasentamiento que trabajan para el UNHCR, la Organización Internacional para la Migración, el Centro de Apoyo al Reasentamiento en África del Servicio Mundial de Iglesias y otros proveedores de servicios a refugiados y asociados en [la tarea del] reasentamiento.A través del Ministerio Episcopal de Migración, la DFMS se asocia con 30 entidades de reasentamiento en 26 diócesis de toda la nación. Esta es una de nueve agencias —cinco de ellas de carácter religioso— que colaboran con el Departamento de Estado de EE.UU. para recibir y reubicar a refugiados en Estados Unidos.La participación de la Iglesia Episcopal en la labor de reasentamiento se remonta por lo menos a la segunda guerra mundial, cuando las iglesias patrocinaron a refugiados que huían de la opresión nazi. A partir del Fondo del Obispo Primado para Ayuda Mundial (en la actualidad Agencia Episcopal de Ayuda y Desarrollo) y la posterior asociación con el Servicio Mundial de Iglesias, la DFMS estableció el Ministerio Episcopal de Migración en 1988.Alumnos de una escuela primaria estudian en un aula del campamento de Gihembe. Más de la mitad de los 14.500 residentes del campo son menores de 18 años. Foto de Wendy Johnson/EMM.Un refugiado es alguien que ha huido de su país de nacionalidad debido a “un temor bien fundado de persecución” por razones de raza, religión, etnia o filiación política o social. Se trata de un estatus internacionalmente reconocido y legalmente protegido .Estados Unidos formalizó su programa de reasentamiento de refugiados con la Ley de Refugiados de 1980 en respuesta al creciente número de refugiados que huían del comunismo en el Sudeste Asiático. Hasta entonces, las iglesias habían patrocinado visas de refugiados, pero a mediados de los años setenta, ese proceso era insuficiente para responder a la necesidad, explicó Stein.En la actualidad, hay 15,5 millones de refugiados en todo el mundo. el mandato del UNHCR es brindarles protección internacional a los refugiados.El UNHCR se concentra fundamentalmente en la repatriación, o el regreso seguro al país de origen, seguido por la naturalización o la residencia legal en el país anfitrión. La tercera opción es el reasentamiento en uno de los más de 20 países en todo el mundo que aceptan refugiados. Globalmente, menos del 1 por ciento de los refugiados recibe [permiso de] reasentamiento, y de esos el 75 por ciento se destina a Estados Unidos.“El éxito de los programas de reasentamiento depende de la asociación y la coordinación. Debemos contar con países para el reasentamiento dispuestos a recibir refugiados”, dijo Paul Kenya, funcionario de reasentamiento que trabaja para el UNHCR en Ruanda, en una entrevista con Episcopal News Service en Kigali. “También debes tener asociados para trabajar con el UNHCR en la identificación y para ayudar en el proceso de las entrevistas, la coordinación de los exámenes médicos y la logística del viaje. Incluso el gobierno de Ruanda nos ayuda en la verificación del estatus del refugiado y en otorgar visas para abandonar el país”.A través de encuestas, la mayoría de los refugiados congoleses dice que no están dispuestos a regresar a su país debido a las condiciones del conflicto bélico que allí reina y porque no pueden recuperar sus tierras si regresan, explicó él.“El reasentamiento se convierte, pues, en la única solución viable para la mayoría de estos refugiados”, dijo Kenya, añadiendo que el año pasado 2.000 congoleses fueron reasentados en Estados Unidos procedentes de campamentos en Ruanda. Esperamos continuar esta prometedora asociación con otra estrategia multianual que abarque los próximos tres o cuatro años, con un promedio de al menos 3.000 refugiados cada año”.Una madre y un niño posan para una foto en el campamento de Gihembe. La mayoría de las familias del campamento están encabezadas por una mujer soltera. Foto de Lynette Wilson/ENS.Una vez identificado para el reasentamiento, ya sea por parte del UNHCR, de un gobierno anfitrión o de otro asociado, el caso del refugiado o de una familia de refugiados se remite al Centro de Apoyo al Reasentamiento en África del Servicio Mundial de Iglesias, que abarca 49 países subsaharianos y ayuda a la Oficina de Población, Refugiados y Migración del Departamento de Estado de EE.UU. a procesar refugiados para su posible admisión en Estados Unidos.Las familias se procesan como un caso, siendo cinco miembros el tamaño promedio de una familia. Muchas familias refugiadas congolesas están encabezadas por mujeres, la mayoría de las cuales son sobrevivientes de traumas y de violencia sexual o de género.Entre tanto, los peregrinos se enteraban — a través de reuniones con funcionarios importantes en las oficinas centrales de Nairobi del centro de apoyo a los refugiados— del proceso, que incluye extensivas verificaciones de antecedentes, que toma un promedio de dos años y que está sujeto a retraso por cualquier cambio que tenga lugar en la familia, tal como un matrimonio o un nacimiento. El Servicio de Ciudadanía e Inmigración de EE.UU., una división del Departamento de Seguridad Nacional, toma la determinación final en los casos destinados a los Estados Unidos.“Preparamos muy bien la referencia del caso de manera que pueda pasar el proceso”, dijo Miro Marinovich, director del centro de apoyo.Residentes del campamento de Gihembe se congregan en torno a la llave de agua para llenar sus bidones. La escasez de agua es usual en el campamento. Foto de Wendy Johnson/EMM.Los refugiados han vivido con escasez de agua y comida y limitadas oportunidades de educación y de trabajo, añadió Marinovich. “Queremos garantizar que eso nunca les suceda otra vez”.De los 174.000 refugiados en Ruanda, el 99 por ciento son congoleses, y la mayoría son mujeres y niños. El UNHCR comenzó a trabajar con países de reasentamiento en una estrategia multianual para reasentar refugiados congoleses en 2012, de los cuales llegó a identificar a 10.000 de ellos en campamentos de Ruanda.Una vez que un acaso es aprobado para reasentamiento, el ritmo se acelera considerablemente. La Organización Internacional para la Migración o IOM, que maneja los exámenes médicos y los viajes, entra en funciones, trasladando a los refugiados a un centro de tránsito regional, donde permanecerán durante dos semanas pendientes de los últimos exámenes médicos y de las verificaciones de seguridad. Durante ese tiempo, comienzan las clases de orientación cultural.Cuando los peregrinos visitaron un centro de tránsito en Nairobi, los niños jugaban afuera en un parque infantil con equipos plásticos, en tanto los adultos en el aula aprendían de economía y presupuestos. Además de salones dedicados a la vida en Canadá, Australia y Estados Unidos (que tiene dos de ellos), una cocina y un baño modelos familiarizan a los refugiados con las comodidades modernas.Una báscula para pesar el equipaje de los pasajeros que se van está situada debajo de un toldo de metal, con sillas plásticas al lado. Un asiento de avión familiariza a los refugiados con el viaje aéreo. Para los que necesiten ropa de viaje, hay atuendos de ropa y zapatillas deportivas para los hombres y ropa más tradicional para las mujeres.El relacionarse con asociados al reasentamiento del exterior le dio a los peregrinos una mejor idea del proceso y le permitió al personal del Ministerio Episcopal de Migración compartir información sobre lo que le sucede a los refugiados cuando llegan a Estados Unidos.“Con mucha frecuencia las personas que participan del procesamiento en el exterior no tienen la menor idea de lo que sucede una vez que un refugiado sube a un avión y viene a Estados Unidos”, dijo Stein. “En consecuencia, así como somos capaces de aprender de nuestros colegas en el UNHCR, la IOM y el centro de apoyo al reasentamiento de refugiados, también podemos compartir información con ellos acerca de lo que les sucede a los refugiados cuando llegan a Estados Unidos”.Paul Kenya, funcionario de reasentamiento que trabaja en Ruanda para el Alto Comisionado de las Naciones Unidas para los Refugiados, y Jessica Benson de la Diócesis de Idaho, hablan con estudiantes en una clase de Ingles como Segundo Idioma en el campamento de Gihembe. Foto de Lynette Wilson/ENS.Durante una reunión comunitaria en el campamento de Gihembe, los refugiados, muchos de ellos frustrados por los años que llevan viviendo en el campamento, estaban desesperados por obtener información acerca de sus casos particulares y lo que podía hacerse para adelantarlos. Pese a que les dijeron que los peregrinos no podían responder a preguntas acerca del proceso, sino más bien ofrecerles información sobre la vida en Estados Unidos, ellos vieron una oportunidad de preguntar por sus casos individuales.La República Democrática del Congo es el segundo país de África en extensión territorial y el cuarto en población, con más de 80 millones de habitantes. En lo que respecta a recursos naturales, entre ellos cobre, plata, oro, diamantes, uranio y otros minerales, es uno de los países más ricos del mundo.Como vecinos, el Congo y Ruanda han estado conectados durante mucho tiempo y a veces en guerra.En la década del setenta del siglo XIX, el rey Leopoldo II de Bélgica segmentó una sección selvática de África Central y la convirtió en su colonia privada, llamándola el “Estado Libre del Congo”. En realidad, no era “libre”. Leopoldo creo un [gigantesco] campo de trabajo forzado para la cosecha del caucho donde se cometieron asesinatos y atrocidades a una escala masiva. En 1908, en respuesta a las protestas por tales violencias, el Congo cayó bajo la jurisdicción del Estado belga.A fines de los años 30, los belgas reclutaron a miles de ruandeses para trabajar en sus ranchos y plantaciones ganaderas en Kivu Norte. La agitación en Ruanda luego de su independencia de Bélgica en 1962 llevó a otros 100.000 ruandeses a la frontera del Congo. En 1971, el gobierno congolés les concedió la ciudadanía a todos los ruandeses que estaban en el país desde 1960; pero más tarde se las revocó.Durante la guerra civil de Ruanda a principio de los años noventa y en el genocidio de 1994, durante el cual se calcula que fueron masacradas de 800.000 a 1 millón de personas en 100 días, los ruandeses siguieron huyendo hacia los países vecinos, entre ellos el Congo. A partir de 1995, los congoleses comenzaron a huir en oleadas de la violencia en el este del Congo, siendo la más reciente de esas migraciones la que comenzó en 2012.Con aproximadamente una décima parte del área del Congo, Ruanda es del tamaño de Massachusetts. Con una población de 11.7 millones, es el país más densamente poblado de África. Siguen habiendo ruandeses desplazados en Uganda, Tanzania y el Congo más de 20 años después del genocidio.Los peregrinos de #ShareTheJourney depositaron una ofrenda floral durante su visita al Monumento en Memoria del Genocidio en Kigali, Ruanda. Se calcula que de 800.000 a 1 millón de personas perecieron durante el genocidio ruandés. Foto de Wendy Johnson/EMM.“Ruanda espera que más de 100.000 ruandeses regresen —de manera que no hay una perspectiva de integración para los refugiados [congoleses], y el reasentamiento se convierte en la única opción para ellos”, dijo Kenya.El reasentamiento es una manera en que la comunidad internacional puede ayudar a aliviar la carga de los países de la región que acogen a refugiados.Antes de los ataques terroristas del 11 de septiembre, Estados Unidos reasentaba alrededor de 80.000 refugiados al año, y hasta llegó a 120.000 a la altura del reasentamiento de refugiados del Sudeste Asiático a principio de los años ochenta. Después del 11 de septiembre, el número descendió a 32.000. Más de una década después, la cuota de 2015 se fijó en 70.000.La cifra de reasentamiento es importante, dicen algunos funcionarios, porque envía un mensaje de disposición a otros países que [también] reasientan y alivian una fracción de la carga del país anfitrión.A diferencia de las torturas y asesinatos en Darfur, Sudán y Sudán del Sur, y del gran número de los que huyen del terrorismo en Somalia, el brutal conflicto del Congo no ha recibido el mismo nivel de atención.Hay 2,7 millones de refugiados y solicitantes de asilo en África Oriental, el Cuerno de África y la región de los Grandes Lagos. Etiopía y Kenia han recibido a la mayoría de las personas que huyen de la violencia y la inestabilidad política en Somalia, Sudán del Sur, Sudán, Eritrea y el Congo. Los somalíes constituyen el grupo de refugiados más numeroso de la región, con más de 970.000 refugiados inscritos.Dos nuevos campamentos se abrieron en Ruanda en 2012, la última vez que se produjo una escalada en el conflicto del Congo. Aun sin un flujo constante de refugiados, los campamentos tienen un crecimiento anual de un 3 por ciento, debido a los niños que nacen en ellos.“El gobierno de Ruanda está sobrecargado con los refugiados, sin embargo, las fronteras siguen estando abiertas”, dijo Kenya. “En los últimos dos años, la población del campamento se ha duplicado, de suerte que el reasentamiento les ofrece esperanza a los refugiados, crea un instrumento para compartir responsabilidad con los países y le da al UNHCR una solución duradera.“Le pedimos a los países que ofrecen reasentamiento que incrementen sus espacios porque la situación en el terreno muestra que las necesidades de reasentamiento existen”.A diferencia de otros países de la región que reciben a refugiados —siendo Etiopía y Kenia los mayores— Ruanda no tiene una política de campamento obligatorio, explicó Kenya. El UNHCR ha comenzado un programa alternativo a los campamentos, integrando sus servicios de educación y salud con el gobierno ruandés.“Si les refugiados regresan alguna vez [a la República Democrática del Congo] o hay alguna otra solución, entonces al menos adquieren sus destrezas y sus vidas funcionan casi a un nivel normal”, puntualizó Kenya. “Pero con la situación de la RDC, no veo la posibilidad del regreso”.– Lynette Wilson es redactora y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. 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