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Dr. Mary Ellen Terrels 1956 – 2021

first_imgTerrels, Dr. Mary Ellen (Juliano), – of Ocean City, passed suddenly, yet peacefully at home on February 15, 2021. She was born in Philadelphia, PA on January 20, 1956. Mary Ellen attended St. Jerome’s School, Nazareth Academy, Bryn Mawr School of Nursing, Catholic University and received her medical degree from Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine.Her professional career spanned forty years as a family practitioner, staff physician, and educator for AtlantiCare. In addition, Mary Ellen was a physician with Crossroad Treatment Centers assisting patients with addiction.Mary Ellen was predeceased by her father, Dominic Juliano, and by Andrew Terrels. She is survived by her daughter Maggie Terrels and her partner Robert Hamilton; son Andrew Terrels; Mother, Margaret Juliano; brothers Mark, Michael, Brian, Anthony, Patrick Juliano and sister Megan Juliano Dawson.Mary Ellen had boundless love for life, her Catholic faith and the EAGLES. Her greatest joy in life were her children and their accomplishments; Maggie serves children and adults as a psychotherapist and Andrew is a Petty Officer in the US Navy.Mary Ellen served as a Board Member of Saint Augustine Preparatory School. In honor of her commitment to education the family requests donations be made to the Saint Augustine’s Student Scholarship fund at https://hermits.com/advancement/make-a-gift/Family and Friends may visit on Saturday, February 20, 2021 from 10:00AM to 11:00AM at the St. Augustine Church of the St. Damien Parish, 13th and Wesley Avenue, Ocean City, NJ, 08226. Covid-19 restrictions are in effect and masks and social distancing are required.In recognition of Mary Ellen’s profession and dedication to her patients, the family requests a private Mass.You may watch her Mass by clicking on the live stream link at www.godfreyfuneralhome.com at 11:00AM. There will be a celebration of Maryellen’s life in Summer 2021. For condolences to the family please visit www.godfreyfuneralhome.com Dr. Mary Ellen Terrels last_img read more


Increasing walking pace may reduce mortality risk suggests study

first_img Source:https://sydney.edu.au/ Jun 1 2018Speeding up your walking pace could extend your life, research led by the University of Sydney suggests.Walking at an average pace was found to be associated with a 20 percent risk reduction for all-cause mortality compared with walking at a slow pace, while walking at a brisk or fast pace was associated with a risk reduction of 24 percent. A similar result was found for risk of cardiovascular disease mortality, with a reduction of 24 percent walking at an average pace and 21 percent walking at a brisk or fast pace, compared to walking at a slow pace.The protective effects of walking pace were also found to be more pronounced in older age groups. Average pace walkers aged 60 years or over experienced a 46 percent reduction in risk of death from cardiovascular causes, and fast pace walkers a 53 percent reduction.Published today, the findings appear in a special issue of the British Journal of Sports Medicine (from the BMJ Journals group) dedicated to Walking and Health, edited by lead author Professor Emmanuel Stamatakis from the University of Sydney’s Charles Perkins Centre and School of Public Health.”A fast pace is generally five to seven kilometers per hour, but it really depends on a walker’s fitness levels; an alternative indicator is to walk at a pace that makes you slightly out of breath or sweaty when sustained,” Professor Stamatakis explained.A collaboration between the University of Sydney’s Charles Perkins Centre and Faculty of Medicine and Health, the University of Cambridge, University of Edinburgh, University of Limerick and University of Ulster, the researchers sought to determine the associations between walking pace with all-cause, cardiovascular disease and cancer mortality.Related StoriesTrump administration cracks down on fetal tissue researchSchwann cells capable of generating protective myelin over nerves finds researchNew research links “broken heart syndrome” to cancerLinking mortality records with the results of 11 population-based surveys in England and Scotland between 1994 and 2008 – in which participants self-reported their walking pace – the research team then adjusted for factors such as total amount and intensity of all physical activity taken, age, sex and body mass index.”Walking pace is associated with all-cause mortality risk, but its specific role – independent from the total physical activity a person undertakes – has received little attention until now,” Professor Stamatakis said.”While sex and body mass index did not appear to influence outcomes, walking at an average or fast pace was associated with a significantly reduced risk of all-cause mortality and cardiovascular disease. There was no evidence to suggest pace had a significant influence on cancer mortality however.”In light of the findings, the research team is calling for walking pace to be emphasized in public health messages.”Separating the effect of one specific aspect of physical activity and understanding its potentially causal association with risk of premature death is complex,” Professor Stamatakis said.”Assuming our results reflect cause and effect, these analyses suggest that increasing walking pace may be a straightforward way for people to improve heart health and risk for premature mortality – providing a simple message for public health campaigns to promote.”Especially in situations when walking more isn’t possible due to time pressures or a less walking-friendly environment, walking faster may be a good option to get the heart rate up – one that most people can easily incorporate into their lives.”last_img read more