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first_img-Kevin Connelly Royal High of Simi Valley distance runners Danny Benson and Jun Reichl have committed to UCLA, joining teammate and two-time defending state 3,200-meter state champion Michael Cybulski with the Bruins. Four Royal distance standouts have signed with UCLA in the past 12 months, including former Highlanders runner Kevin Sullivan. UCLA’s 2007 track and field recruiting class is considered among the best in the nation, with defending 800-meter state champion Cory Primm (Westlake High) having also signed with the Bruins. -Kevin Connelly UCLA sophomore shortstop Brandon Crawford was named Pac-10 Player of the week for his .533 average (8 for 15) for the week of Feb. 12-18. Crawford hit the game-winning grand slam in the Bruins 9-7 come-from-behind win against East Carolina Saturday afternoon. Crawford also led UCLA with a 3-for-4 outing and scored two runs in the Bruins’ 3-2 win against UC Riverside Feb. 13. Crawford has hit in each of UCLA’s 10 games this season. -Heather Gripp Still looking for a place to create your very own high school fantasy sports team? Look no further than dyestatcal.com, a prominent track and field Web site, which is offering a free fantasy sports league based on the performances of the top boys and girls distance runners in the state. “If there’s one thing kids and fans keep asking us for, it’s to start fantasy leagues,” Dyestatcal editor Rich Gonzalez said. “They like being involved in contests and seem especially excited as this one centers around their peers.” In order to join, persons must choose a team of seven prep distance runners, with the quality of the runners separated into tiers. Each team must have two elite runners from tier one, two runners from tier two, two runners from tier three, and one at-large runner from tier four. The local “tier one” runners on the boys’ side are Michael Cybulski (Royal of Simi Valley) and Cory Primm (Westlake), while Shannon Murakami (Saugus) and Anna Sperry (Simi Valley) both received the distinction on the girls’ side. The scoring is complex, and it is described in detail on the site. The site promises to update the results on weekly basis, while the prize for first place includes a pair of adidas running shoes. It does not yet include a format for other track and field events, but promises to do so as the concept becomes more popular. -Kevin Connelly Royal runners commit to UCLA Bruins SS named week’s Pac-10 player Your fantasy come true All-Star basketball game set for April 21 The 2007 valley sports foundation senior All-Star basketball game is set for Saturday, April 21 at Cal State Northridge. The game will feature all the best seniors from the San Fernando Valley and surrounding areas. Rosters will be announced the third week of March. For more info on this year’s event please contact Jack Pollon at (818) 425-8737 or [email protected] – Gerry Gittelson 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! Area football players among nation’s best Eight local football players from the class of 2008 have been recognized among the top athletes in the nation by rivals.com, which released its 250 players to watch list for next season. The list includes: Wes Horton (Notre Dame of Sherman Oaks), Dayne Crist (Notre Dame), Anthony McDonald (Notre Dame), Milton Knox (Birmingham of Lake Balboa), Malik Jackson (Birmingham), Delano Howell (Hart of Newhall), E.J. Woods (Crespi of Encino) and Joseph Fauria (Crespi). center_img Horton, Knox and Woods were also named to the Rivals top 100 list. Former Moorpark running back Darrell Scott was also recognized. Scott has transferred to St. Bonaventure of Ventura for his senior season. last_img read more


Two boys suspected of taking handbag with cash from office

first_imgGardai are searching for two young boys suspected of stealing a handbag containing a substantial amount of cash from an office in Letterkenny.The robbery took place at Pearse Road at 9.30am on Saturday morning last.The suspects are described as being either 14 or 15 years old. The first is described as wearing an 11 degrees navy hooded with grey tracksuit bottoms.The second suspect is about 15 years old with red, short or sandy hair and he was wearing a navy hoodie and navy tracksuit bottoms.The area would have been quite busy that morning as the local car boot sale takes place at nearby Letterkenny Community Centre.Anybody who may have spotted these suspects or may know anything about the crime should contact Letterkenny Gardai. Two boys suspected of taking handbag with cash from office was last modified: August 27th, 2019 by Staff WriterShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:handbagletterkennyPearse Roadtheftlast_img read more


Athletics’ Piscotty has melanoma removed from right ear

first_imgOAKLAND — The Athletics arrived at the Coliseum for the start of a 10-game home stand Friday to the news that right fielder Stephen Piscotty had undergone surgery to remove a melanoma from his right ear.Piscotty underwent a routine check on May 28, and a mole on his right outer lobe was biopsied, and on June 5 tests came back positive for melanoma, a form of skin cancer. Surgery was performed Thursday at the California Pacific Medical Center in San Francisco.“What we know is we believe it …last_img


Big Science in Crisis of Trust

first_img(Visited 37 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 A flurry of recent articles underscore the absolute necessity for integrity in science.America is having a crisis of faith in science, worries Science Magazine in its May 1, 2015 issue. Todd L. Pitensky of Stony Brook University offers six suggestions to restore confidence, including transparency, humility, righteous indignation at misconduct, and other character qualities.Numerous psychological experiments published in journals fail reproducibility tests, says Nature. Only 39% of results could be reproduced.The American Psychological Association is being hit with charges about collusion with the CIA on “torture” of Gitmo prisoners, says Science Magazine, which takes a left-leaning position on this controversial issue.A fierce debate is going on right now about the ethics of editing human embryos, reports Nature. NIH director Francis Collins reiterated America’s ban on the practice, Nature says—at least for now, as western societies fret over the ramifications of China’s frontier experiments on genetic manipulation of embryos.Science Magazine reports that a House panel is holding hearings about “politically driven science.” The AAAS, as expected, justifies all science and is finger-pointing at flaws in the investigation, but are they not an interested party as recipients of major funding?The bar graph, that very common way of displaying data, is being criticized as potentially misleading, reports Nature (see Statistics in the Baloney Detector). For continuous data, it gives a false impression of discrete values. But P-values (widely-used measures of statistical significance) have also come under fire lately. They are just the “tip of the iceberg,” Nature says, of “shoddy statistics” in scientific papers.Rachel Bernstein of Science Insider announces, “PLOS ONE ousts reviewer, editor after sexist peer-review storm.” How about double-blind peer review? Would that help? Nature says that actually poses a double risk.Electronic media have created another ethical quandary: transparency vs harassment. Michael Halpern and Michael Mann (yes, the NASA climate change guy) at Science Magazine worry over the issues involved, such as disclosure, privacy, reputations getting threatened, chilling of free speech, and other bad behavior.Japan is still struggling to recoup its reputation after the STAP stem cell debacle, Nature reports.But why worry? It’s all just evolution, a paper in Current Biology says. Even “social amoebas” (yes, the microbes) have cheaters and cooperators. Two authors claim that “slimy cheats pay a price,” but maybe cooperation is in the eye of the beholder. Like the moral equivalence some relativists claim, “one man’s terrorist is another man’s freedom fighter.”Look, why don’t scientists just adopt the Ten Commandments? (see Prager University course). Then all would be well. Nobody would knowingly give false witness. Nobody would curse. Nobody would covet someone else’s data. If they all took Jesus’s summation of the law (to love God and love thy neighbor), every scientist would be eager for truth to prevail, regardless of who gets the credit. It would be a scientific utopia.Instead, you have this crisis of trust. Scientists have God-given consciences which they deny, but they wring their hands over all these ethical questions, knowing deep inside that truth and integrity matter. On they one hand, they claim that social cooperation is an evolutionary artifact (therefore subjective), but then they go running to Judeo-Christian theological presuppositions for implicit moral support (i.e., we must punish research misconduct, we must stop plagiarism, we must do better than “shoddy statistics” and such).Let’s laugh at Nature and Science. Force them to use their own presuppositions. “You’re evolutionists, aren’t you?” (Well, but of course.) Then cheating is an evolutionary game. It’s not wrong. We’re just like social amoebas. In fact, if I get enough cheaters to join me, we’ll become the norm and you guys will be the cheaters.” (But that’s not right!) “Oh, so you believe in objective morality? Let’s see you evolve that without God!” (You must be one of those stupid, ignorant, lying creationist dodo heads.) “Is it wrong to be one of those?” (Yes!) “Is it evil?” (Yes, it’s not right!) “OK, so you believe in objective morality? Let’s see you evolve that without God.” (Aaargh!)last_img read more


Mandela left his mark on many homes

first_imgThe little Orlando house, at 8115 Ngakane Street, on the corner of Vilakazi Street, was Mandela’s first home of his own. (Image: South African Tourism) • Sello Hatang Chief Executive Officer Nelson Mandela Foundation +27 11 547 5600 [email protected] • Mandela’s memories of Qunu, his childhood village • Mandela’s museum a gift to Qunu • Soweto: from struggle to suburbia • Nelson Mandela: son of Qunu returns to the soil • More to South Africa than Nelson MandelaRomaana NaidooNelson Rolihlahla Mandela came from humble beginnings, living in a remote rural village before moving to the big city, where he started out in a backyard shack with no electricity before he bought his own little house in Soweto. With the coming of democracy, he settled in a previously all white suburb of Joburg.“I was born on 18 July 1918 at Mvezo, a tiny village on the banks of the Mbashe River in the district of Umtata, the capital of the Transkei,” he noted in his autobiography, Long Walk To Freedom. The Transkei, according to the book, is 800 miles, or 1 300 kilometres, east of Cape Town and 550 miles, or 880 kilometres, south of Johannesburg.As a young boy, Mandela moved to Qunu, spending his childhood in Transkei before moving to the big city. “Johannesburg in those days was a combination frontier town and modern city,” he noted. After a brief stay with his cousin, who had moved north before him, Mandela arranged to move in with Reverend J Mabutho at his home on Eighth Avenue in Alexandra, a township in north-eastern Joburg.“Reverend Mabutho was a fellow Thembu, a friend of my family and a generous, God-fearing man,” he wrote. But this arrangement came to end because Mandela was not completely honest about the reasons why he left the Transkei – he had fled before an arranged marriage. “Reverend Mabutho took pity on me and found me accommodation with his next-door neighbours, the Xhoma family.“Mr Xhoma was one of an elite handful of African landowners in Alexandra. His house – 46 Seventh Avenue – was small, particularly as he had six children, but it was pleasant, with a veranda and a tiny garden. In order to make ends meet, Mr Xhoma, like so many other residents of Alexandra, rented rooms to boarders.”Life in AlexandraHe lived for a short while in 1941 and 1942 at what is now called Mandela’s Yard, in the township. Mandela described that accommodation as being a tin-roofed room at the back of the main house, no more than a shack, with a dirt floor, no heat, no electricity, and no running water. “Life in Alexandra was exhilarating and precarious. Its atmosphere was alive, its spirit adventurous, its people resourceful.”He added: “Urban life tended to abrade tribal and ethnic distinctions, and instead of being Xhosas, or Sothos, or Zulus or Shangaans, we were Alexandrans.”In his autobiography he wrote: “Alexandra occupies a treasured place in my heart. It was the first place I ever lived away from home. Even though I was later to live in Orlando, a small section of Soweto, for a far longer period than I did in Alexandra, I always regarded Alexandra Township as a home where I had no specific house, and Orlando as a place where I had a house but no home.”Moving to SowetoThe little Orlando house, at 8115 Ngakane Street, on the corner of Vilakazi Street, was also a humble dwelling. Now called the Mandela Family Museum, it was Mandela’s first home of his own. He moved in with his first wife, Evelyn Ntoko Mase, in 1946. After their divorce, she moved out and his second wife, Winnie Madikizela, moved into the home in 1958. After his arrest and incarceration on Robben Island, Madikizela-Mandela continued to live in the house with their daughters, Zenani and Zindziswa, or Zinzi. In those long years of the anti-apartheid struggle, the house was petrol-bombed and set alight several times.On his release in 1990, Mandela refused to move to the more opulent home, also in Orlando West, that Madikizela-Mandela had built while he was in jail. He wanted only to return to the house of his memories. But he stayed at that house for a mere 11 days, as he was moved around from one secret location to the next until he finally settled at his Houghton residence. This was his last and final home before his death on 5 December 2013.Mandela separated from Madikizela-Mandela in 1992 and the couple were divorced in 1996. Although her ex-husband handed the house to the Soweto Heritage Trust, Madikizela-Mandela refused to relinquish it and instead converted it into the Mandela Family Museum in 1997. She also opened a pub and restaurant across the road, the famed Vilakazi Street.During the inauguration of the museum, at which bottles of “Mandela garden soil” were sold, Madikizela-Mandela said: “A lot of history was made here. This is where the 1976 students’ uprising began, where the youth leadership met to change the face of South Africa.”Back to QunuAfter leaving the Presidency, Mandela divided his time between Qunu in Transkei and Houghton. In his autobiography, Mandela told of a happy childhood in Qunu, where he was laid to rest on Sunday, 15 December 2013.“The village of Qunu was situated in a narrow, grassy valley crisscrossed by clear streams, and overlooked by green hills,” Mandela wrote. “It consisted of no more than a few hundred people who lived in huts, which were beehive-shaped structures of mud walls.”Today, Mandela’s home in Qunu can be described as a quaint dwelling compared to city standards, yet it stands out in the village. Once a herd boy on the rolling hills outside Qunu, he was buried in the soil where he used to play as a child. His burial in Qunu stems from the Xhosa belief that the deceased must be brought home to be reunited with their ancestors and to sleep in the ground from where they were taken. The philosophy is circular, that at the end, a person returns to the beginning.last_img read more