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Should Lukaku be sent out on loan?

first_imgFulham and Stoke City are among the clubs interested in a loan deal for Romelu Lukaku. But after the striker scored twice against Seattle Sounders, Chelsea boss Roberto Di Matteo made it clear he wanted to see more of him in action before making a decision on his future.[poll id=”26″]See also: Chelsea boss will not rush Lukaku decisionFollow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img


Knowing and Doing

first_imgDan Pink is one of my favorite writers. To Sell Is Human should be required reading, especially for non-salespeople who have to sell. His book Drive should be required reading for leaders and managers.I love Malcolm Gladwell, too. Like Pink, he is a tremendous writer and storyteller. The Tipping Point should be required reading for entrepreneurs and marketers. Blink should be required reading for salespeople. And Outliers should be read by all success-minded people.Both Pink and Gladwell are intellectuals. They both intellectualize the topics about which they write. You can learn a lot by reading them. But you can’t learn what you need to learn to be successful by reading intellectualized accounts of any subject.I have never played tennis, nor have I ever been on skis. I have never hit a tennis ball over a net, and I have never once made my way down the side of a mountain or a hill on two slick pieces of plastic. I could right now read a dozen books on tennis or skiing and still be completely unable to play tennis or ski better than I could by taking a couple of lessons. But having taken some lessons and spending some time on a tennis court or a hill, reading could help me understand my experience and how to improve it.You produce the best results in areas you are working to improve by coupling your experiential learning with your intellectual learning.If you read any good book on investing, that book will surely tell you that you must not be emotional about the investments you make. When you start losing in a position, you sell that position and protect yourself from losses. But you won’t know what it feels like to sell a stock that is down 10% when it is being hyped on television and when other people are building their position.You can read a good book on selling, and you will almost invariably find something about closing, or asking for commitments. You can read the words, you can understand the script, but until you ask a prospective client sitting across from you to sign an agreement, you won’t have any idea what that experience feels like (especially when they refuse to sign).You can read books about success and personal development, all of which have valuable messages and even more valuable guides to the actions you must take in order to succeed. But reading about personal development and success won’t make you successful. Only taking action will. (But if you take in enough success-oriented content, I promise you will start to take action.)There is a difference between an intellectual understanding of a subject and actually knowing the subject matter. Knowing something alone doesn’t produce any measurable results. Knowing something, having some chops, only works if you couple it with action (and if it’s something important to you, massive action). You will learn much of what you need to be successful by doing.You know enough already. But are you taking enough action?last_img read more


Shane Warne, Liz Hurley promote apparel brand ‘Spinners’

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Microsoft offers online protection to politicos amid preelection security fears

first_imgOTTAWA — As a federal election approaches, Microsoft is offering advanced online threat-detection tools to Canadian political candidates and parties to shore up their cyberdefences.Microsoft’s AccountGuard, designed to warn customers about cyberthreats — including attacks by nation-states — will be provided free to registered parties at the federal and provincial level, think-tanks and democracy advocacy organizations that already use the company’s Office 365, Outlook.com and Hotmail products.The company is also offering political officials, campaigns and related organizations practical guidance to help make their networks and email systems more secure — from proper log-in procedures to recognizing attempts to steal information.In providing the tools, the company is mindful that Russian intelligence agents stand accused of hacking Democratic party emails and computers during the 2016 U.S. presidential campaign.Jan Neutze, global director for cybersecurity policy at Microsoft, said one of the favoured techniques of cybercriminals and state-sponsored hackers remains the spear-phishing email — an innocent-looking message that can lure those who click on it into giving up their private credentials or other vital details.That can open the door to data theft or stolen emails that may be used for damaging leaks or extortion.Microsoft’s monitoring team will help detect malicious activity against accounts, try to determine the source of the attempted intrusion and inform customers of threats.Many organizations in politics have small staffs and modest budgets, Neutze noted. “Yet they’re facing nation-state adversaries. And so it’s a total mismatch in terms of their capabilities to defend themselves versus the threats that they’re facing.”Some, but not all, larger organizations such as political parties have started to take more protective measures, he said. “I think there’s a recognition that oftentimes organizations aren’t necessarily able to defend against these threats by themselves.”The Liberal government recently announced that an impartial group of senior bureaucrats would warn Canadians if malicious actors try to distort the outcome of the October election through serious cyberattacks or orchestrated disinformation campaigns via social media.The protocol is part of a series of measures aimed at preventing interference in the election.Jim Bronskill, The Canadian Presslast_img read more


Indigenous issues find new outlet through Occupy movement

first_imgAPTN National NewsIt is a global movement aimed at corporate greed.But in many parts of the country Aboriginal groups have jumped aboard the Occupy movement to bring the issues of homelessness, high unemployment and deplorable living conditions to the forefront.APTN National News reporter Tiar Wilson has the story.last_img


The life and legacy of John Trudell

first_imgAPTN National NewsHe was an actor, poet and outspoken activist.John Trudell was a household name for many Indigenous people.He passed away Tuesday at his California home. He was 69.APTN’s Shaneen Robinson looks at the life and legacy of John Trudell.last_img


Study provides potential new targets for treating epilepsy

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Researchers develop model of intestinal infection that could advance vaccine development

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DDay for Facebook Zuckerberg before skeptical lawmakers

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg held private meetings Monday with lawmakers ahead of his congressional testimony Tuesday and Wednesday “I started Facebook, I run it, and I’m responsible for what happens here.”In his written remarks, Zuckerberg called Facebook “an idealistic and optimistic company” and said: “We focused on all the good that connecting people can bring.”But he acknowledged that “it’s clear now that we didn’t do enough to prevent these tools from being used for harm as well. That goes for fake news, foreign interference in elections, and hate speech, as well as developers and data privacy.”Zuckerberg said he has called for more investments in security that will “significantly impact our profitability going forward,” adding: “I want to be clear about what our priority is: protecting our community is more important than maximizing our profit.” © 2018 AFP Cardboard cutouts of Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg stand outside the US Capitol, placed by advocacy group Avaaz to call attention to what the group says are fake accounts still spreading disinformation on Facebook Graphic showing Facebook’s presence around the world Facebook chief Mark Zuckerberg was set for a fiery face-off on Capitol Hill Tuesday as he attempts to quell a firestorm over privacy and security lapses at the social network that have angered lawmakers and the site’s two billion users. ‘Investigating every app’Zuckerberg recounted a list of steps announced by Facebook aimed at averting a repeat of the improper use of data by third parties like Cambridge Analytica, and noted that other applications were also being investigated to determine if they did anything wrong.”We’re in the process of investigating every app that had access to a large amount of information before we locked down our platform in 2014,” said Zuckerberg.”If we detect suspicious activity, we’ll do a full forensic audit. And if we find that someone is improperly using data, we’ll ban them and tell everyone affected.”Zuckerberg met behind closed doors with Senators Bill Nelson of Florida and Dianne Feinstein of California, among others.Backing ‘Honest Ads’On Friday, Facebook sought to quell some concerns over political manipulation of its platform by announcing support for the “Honest Ads Act” that requires election ad buyers to be identified, and to go further with verification of sponsors of ads on key public policy issues.Zuckerberg said the change will mean “we will hire thousands of more people” to get the new system in place ahead of US midterm elections in November.”We’re starting this in the US and expanding to the rest of the world in the coming months,” Zuckerberg said.On Monday, Facebook agreed to supply proprietary data for a study on its role in elections and democracy.”The goal is both to get the ideas of leading academics on how to address these issues as well as to hold us accountable for making sure we protect the integrity of these elections on Facebook,” Zuckerberg wrote on his Facebook page.”Looking back, it’s clear we were too slow identifying election interference in 2016, and we need to do better in future elections.” Zuckerberg prepares another apology—this time to Congress Citation: D-Day for Facebook, Zuckerberg before skeptical lawmakers (2018, April 10) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-04-d-day-facebook-zuckerberg-skeptical-lawmakers.html Explore further Zuckerberg, making his first formal appearance at a Congressional hearing, will seek to allay widespread fears ignited by the leaking of private data on tens of millions of users to a British firm working on Donald Trump’s 2016 campaign.The scandal has sparked fresh talk about regulation of social media platforms, and Facebook in the past week has sought to stem criticism by endorsing at least one legislative proposal, which would require better labeling and disclosure on political advertising.Senator Bill Nelson, one of the lawmakers who met privately Monday with Zuckerberg, said he believes the 33-year-old CEO is taking the matter seriously.”I believe he understands that regulation could be right around the corner,” the Florida Democrat said.Other lawmakers were less clear about the need for new regulations.Republican Senator John Kennedy of Louisiana said, “I’m not interested in regulating Facebook. I’m interested in Facebook regulating itself and solving the problems. I come in peace.”Zuckerberg was set to appear before a Senate panel from 1815 GMT, with another session in the House of Representatives Wednesday.The huge social network has begun alerting some users about whether their data was leaked to the British firm Cambridge Analytica.Notification is among several steps pledged by Facebook to fix pervasive problems on data security and manipulation of the platform used by some two billion people worldwide. Senate Judiciary Chairman Charles Grassley said Tuesday’s hearing is the first step in an “open dialogue about how we address growing consumer privacy concerns.” “The tech industry has a duty to respond to widespread and growing privacy concerns and restore the public trust. The status quo no longer works,” Grassley added.Suit and tieOn Monday, Zuckerberg ditched his trademark T-shirt for a somber dark suit and tie as he made the rounds on Capitol Hill and sounded contrite about Facebook’s conduct.”We didn’t take a broad enough view of our responsibility, and that was a big mistake. It was my mistake, and I’m sorry,” Zuckerberg said in his written testimony released by the House commerce committee. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. read more