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Fishing the North Coast: Chetco fall kings on the decline

first_imgFall Chinook salmon returning to the Chetco are on the decline, and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife is proposing some pretty drastic cutbacks. In a press release issued on Monday, the ODFW is proposing temporary harvest limits and closures for coastal wild fall chinook fisheries due to low escapement in 2018 and poor forecasts for this year.Preseason forecasts show fewer than 1,300 wild spawning Chinook will return to the Chetco, which is below the minimum needed to keep the …last_img


49ers OTA preview: What other than Garoppolo is worth studying?

first_imgSANTA CLARA – Let the games begin. Well, not officially for a few months, but the 49ers’ game-within-the-game position battles now commence.Organized team activities begin Monday, and these ramped-up practices offer a first look at the most promising roster battles in coach Kyle Shanahan’s three years.Here are five players or groups under the most scrutiny:1. Is Jimmy G’s knee A-OK? Don’t dare let fatigue set in when it comes to reports about Jimmy Garoppolo’s knee rehabilitation. …last_img


Seeing Africa in a new light

first_img10 October 2006By this time next year, global perceptions of Africa could be changing radically as two major new international television stations project a different image of the continent and provide African viewers with a global context to better understand global forces and seek advantage for the continent in trade, investment and tourism.The two new stations – CNBC Africa and Al Jazeera International, which are both set to go live in the next six months or so – will intensify the media spotlight on Africa at a time when the northern hemisphere view of the world is being increasingly challenged by economic realities and reforms at the United Nations and multilateral institutions.New global realitiesA recent cover story in the influential Economist pointed out that the developing world now accounts for more than 50% of global economic output measured in purchasing-power parity.The rise of major industrialising developing powers – such as China, India, Brazil, Mexico, South Korea and Turkey – have prompted reforms at the UN, IMF and World Bank as the global centre of gravity shifts closer to the developing countries.Major corporations in the developing countries – such as India’s Tata Industries and South Africa’s SABMiller – now account for more than a third of all foreign direct investment in the developing world.South-south co-operation is no longer a political slogan – it has become an economic reality. Increasingly, global economic growth depends on the economic growth of developing countries.24-hour Africa business channelIn recognition of these new realities – and the emergence of Africa as a major trade and investment partner of China and the new developing powers – CNBC, the global business TV leader, is set to open a 24-hour Africa business channel by mid-2007 with an initial investment of R190-million (roughly US$25-million).CNBC Africa, an autonomous unit with its headquarters in Johannesburg and set to train a new genetation of African financial journalists, will beam six hours of dedicated Africa programming each week day and will have correspondents in Cape Town, Nigeria, Kenya, Tanzania, Botswana and London. It will also incorporate its Asian, Middle Eastern and European services for its African viewers.Zafar Siddiqi, chairman of CNBC Africa, said that the new service would address dysfunctional broadcasting policies between African countries, poor communications and inadequate marketing on the continent and an over-sensationalisation of news.“We will set a new standard in broadcasting on the continent that will spur others … we will work closely with all broadcasters around Africa,” Siddiqi told the the first International Media Forum in Johannesburg last month.The Forum, which was partnered by the International Marketing Council of South Africa, sought to promote a dialogue between international media and South Africans about mutual perceptions of the country and the African continent.Al Jazeera: five new Africa bureauxAl Jazeera International, a new English-language station spawned by the successful Qatar-based Arabic station serving the Middle East, is due to go live before the end of the year with a 24-hour global news service with five bureaux in Africa.Al Jazeera has hired some of the top names in British journalism, including the legendary interviewer David Frost and former BBC heavyweight Nigel Parsons, who heads the station. It seeks to portray global news from a centre of gravity which lies outside of the industrialised world, and will portray global news from a developing world perspective, thus reflecting the new global realities.“We will set out to normalise news coverage in Africa,” said Andrew Simmonds, Al Jazeera International’s Africa bureau chief, who attended the Forum.The renewed interest in Africa is being driven by a confluence of forces: increased global interest in Africa’s rich resources – particularly oil and steel – the rapid rise of the continent as a destination for Chinese and Indian investment and trade, major growth in South African investment in Africa, and a deeper understanding of the link between terrorism, poverty and failed states.No built-in bias against AfricaDelegates to the International Media Forum heard a succession of influential speakers representing the world’s leading news organisations – CNBC, CNN, Al Jazeera, the Wall Street Journal, BBC, DowJones Newswires, Reuters and Africa Confidential – sketch the news global realities and the rising importance of Africa in a globalised world.The messages that come through repeatedly were that news organisations are driven by what their readers and subscribers want – rather than focussing on either negative or positive news – that there is no built-in bias against Africa, and that African countries and companies need to develop better communication strategies to compete in the global market place if ideas and enterprises.South African Minister in the Presidency Essop Pahad, who spoke at the conference, welcomed the tone of speeches from the international editors and suggested that South Africans should revisit the view that the global media was a monolithic bloc that sought to marginalise the continent and entrench negative stereotypes.“We cannot simply dismiss negative reportage as the product of the racist or the colonial mindset, nor must we paint all reporters with the same brush,” he said. “We also need to be more open to investigative journalism.”Randy Walerius, London-based Africa and Middle East editor at Dow Jones Newswires, said that the slogan and driving force of his news organisation was: “news to profit by”.“We don’t look at news as positive or negative,” he said. “It’s whether the news offers news [for readers and subscribers] to profit by.”Importance of open communicationThemba Maseko, the new director-general of South Africa’s Government Communication and Information System (GCIS), presented the government’s new communications strategy, which seeks to correct preceptions by clear and repeated communication of government policy and its achievements, and promised better access for journalists.Addressing a dinner of the international media and invited guests, Pahad suggested that the Forum should become a regular event on the annual calendar.The Forum kicked off an overdue debate between the international media and South African stakeholders in business and communications about differing domestic and international perceptions of South Africa and the importance of open and clear communication to promote good governance and economic transparency.South Africa’s challenge is to ensure that just as opportunities open up for Africa and South Africa with changing international perceptions, we do not become prisoners to our own stereotypes that global opinion is biased against us and always looking to reinforce the negative.It is time to open ourselves to international scrutiny and put our case more convincingly and more professionally.John Battersby is the UK country manager of the International Marketing Council of South Africa, based in London. He recently accompanied a group of leading international journalists, editors and managers on a visit to South Africa to attend the first International Media Forum. Want to use this article in your publication or on your website?See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more


Press release: Brand South Africa and Trialogue encourage volunteerism

first_imgBrand South Africa partnered with Trialogue to host its quarterly Trialogue CSI forum in Johannesburg and Cape Town. These forums call on all those working in the Corporate Social Investment (CSI) field to collaborate and engage on issues in the CSI environment.Despite uncertainty and tougher trading conditions in almost every sector of the economy, corporate South Africa continues to demonstrate its commitment to CSI. (Image: Brian Mthembu)“Volunteering is the ultimate exercise in democracy. When you volunteer, you vote every day about the kind of community you want to live in.” Marjorie MooreBrand South Africa partnered with Trialogue to host its quarterly Trialogue CSI forum in Johannesburg and Cape Town.The purpose of these forums is to call on all those working in the Corporate Social Investment (CSI) field to collaborate and engage on issues faced in the CSI environment; to extend the initiatives to corporate employees to be active citizens and volunteer their time and skills for the great good of society.“Brand South Africa found an opportunity to partner with Trialogue in order to present our Play Your Part nationwide movement, which intends to inspire and motivate active citizenship in South Africa,” said Brand South Africa’s GM: Marketing Sithembile Ntombela.Trialogue is a business that specialises in social corporate responsibility and has been hosting CSI forums since the beginning of 2013. Held four times a year, each forum provides valuable insights on active citizenship.“As Play Your Part, we showcase how ordinary people and corporates are contributing to society. We unpack the drivers that contribute positively to the Nation Brand and its competitiveness through the movement,” concludes Ntombela.Trialogue director, Cathy Duff, said: “The sessions explore trends in volunteering, local best practice, how the impact of volunteerism can be measured, the types of volunteering support that non-profit organisations are looking for, and how to effectively manage volunteering programmes.”At the forum, Duff shared insights on the research conducted on organisational CSI programmes and employee volunteerism that will be captured in a Trialogue booklet, which can be purchased through the Trialogue website .Despite uncertainty and tougher trading conditions in almost every sector of the economy, corporate South Africa continues to demonstrate its commitment to CSI. CSI expenditure in South Africa was estimated to be worth R8.6 billion in 2016, significantly up from R2.9 billion in 2006, according to Trialogue’s Business in Society engagement.“South Africans, in general, are a giving nation. When it comes to formal domestic programmes in CSI and volunteerism, South Africa is ahead compared to other countries, whilst on an international platform we fall behind, there is a very small percentage spent outside the country,” concludes Duff.Further points that emerged from the forum included;How to encourage employees to volunteer;Barriers to volunteerism; andWhether the lack of employee volunteerism could be linked to organisational culture and leadership.Organisations and employees are encouraged to participate in the Trialogue forums, volunteer their time and educate themselves on the various volunteerism programmes available on http://trialogue.co.za/Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more


Mandela left his mark on many homes

first_imgThe little Orlando house, at 8115 Ngakane Street, on the corner of Vilakazi Street, was Mandela’s first home of his own. (Image: South African Tourism) • Sello Hatang Chief Executive Officer Nelson Mandela Foundation +27 11 547 5600 [email protected] • Mandela’s memories of Qunu, his childhood village • Mandela’s museum a gift to Qunu • Soweto: from struggle to suburbia • Nelson Mandela: son of Qunu returns to the soil • More to South Africa than Nelson MandelaRomaana NaidooNelson Rolihlahla Mandela came from humble beginnings, living in a remote rural village before moving to the big city, where he started out in a backyard shack with no electricity before he bought his own little house in Soweto. With the coming of democracy, he settled in a previously all white suburb of Joburg.“I was born on 18 July 1918 at Mvezo, a tiny village on the banks of the Mbashe River in the district of Umtata, the capital of the Transkei,” he noted in his autobiography, Long Walk To Freedom. The Transkei, according to the book, is 800 miles, or 1 300 kilometres, east of Cape Town and 550 miles, or 880 kilometres, south of Johannesburg.As a young boy, Mandela moved to Qunu, spending his childhood in Transkei before moving to the big city. “Johannesburg in those days was a combination frontier town and modern city,” he noted. After a brief stay with his cousin, who had moved north before him, Mandela arranged to move in with Reverend J Mabutho at his home on Eighth Avenue in Alexandra, a township in north-eastern Joburg.“Reverend Mabutho was a fellow Thembu, a friend of my family and a generous, God-fearing man,” he wrote. But this arrangement came to end because Mandela was not completely honest about the reasons why he left the Transkei – he had fled before an arranged marriage. “Reverend Mabutho took pity on me and found me accommodation with his next-door neighbours, the Xhoma family.“Mr Xhoma was one of an elite handful of African landowners in Alexandra. His house – 46 Seventh Avenue – was small, particularly as he had six children, but it was pleasant, with a veranda and a tiny garden. In order to make ends meet, Mr Xhoma, like so many other residents of Alexandra, rented rooms to boarders.”Life in AlexandraHe lived for a short while in 1941 and 1942 at what is now called Mandela’s Yard, in the township. Mandela described that accommodation as being a tin-roofed room at the back of the main house, no more than a shack, with a dirt floor, no heat, no electricity, and no running water. “Life in Alexandra was exhilarating and precarious. Its atmosphere was alive, its spirit adventurous, its people resourceful.”He added: “Urban life tended to abrade tribal and ethnic distinctions, and instead of being Xhosas, or Sothos, or Zulus or Shangaans, we were Alexandrans.”In his autobiography he wrote: “Alexandra occupies a treasured place in my heart. It was the first place I ever lived away from home. Even though I was later to live in Orlando, a small section of Soweto, for a far longer period than I did in Alexandra, I always regarded Alexandra Township as a home where I had no specific house, and Orlando as a place where I had a house but no home.”Moving to SowetoThe little Orlando house, at 8115 Ngakane Street, on the corner of Vilakazi Street, was also a humble dwelling. Now called the Mandela Family Museum, it was Mandela’s first home of his own. He moved in with his first wife, Evelyn Ntoko Mase, in 1946. After their divorce, she moved out and his second wife, Winnie Madikizela, moved into the home in 1958. After his arrest and incarceration on Robben Island, Madikizela-Mandela continued to live in the house with their daughters, Zenani and Zindziswa, or Zinzi. In those long years of the anti-apartheid struggle, the house was petrol-bombed and set alight several times.On his release in 1990, Mandela refused to move to the more opulent home, also in Orlando West, that Madikizela-Mandela had built while he was in jail. He wanted only to return to the house of his memories. But he stayed at that house for a mere 11 days, as he was moved around from one secret location to the next until he finally settled at his Houghton residence. This was his last and final home before his death on 5 December 2013.Mandela separated from Madikizela-Mandela in 1992 and the couple were divorced in 1996. Although her ex-husband handed the house to the Soweto Heritage Trust, Madikizela-Mandela refused to relinquish it and instead converted it into the Mandela Family Museum in 1997. She also opened a pub and restaurant across the road, the famed Vilakazi Street.During the inauguration of the museum, at which bottles of “Mandela garden soil” were sold, Madikizela-Mandela said: “A lot of history was made here. This is where the 1976 students’ uprising began, where the youth leadership met to change the face of South Africa.”Back to QunuAfter leaving the Presidency, Mandela divided his time between Qunu in Transkei and Houghton. In his autobiography, Mandela told of a happy childhood in Qunu, where he was laid to rest on Sunday, 15 December 2013.“The village of Qunu was situated in a narrow, grassy valley crisscrossed by clear streams, and overlooked by green hills,” Mandela wrote. “It consisted of no more than a few hundred people who lived in huts, which were beehive-shaped structures of mud walls.”Today, Mandela’s home in Qunu can be described as a quaint dwelling compared to city standards, yet it stands out in the village. Once a herd boy on the rolling hills outside Qunu, he was buried in the soil where he used to play as a child. His burial in Qunu stems from the Xhosa belief that the deceased must be brought home to be reunited with their ancestors and to sleep in the ground from where they were taken. The philosophy is circular, that at the end, a person returns to the beginning.last_img read more


Jets Sign Jenkins, McLendon

first_imgTweetPinShare0 Shares NEW YORK — The New York Jets refilled their defensive line after losing “Snacks.”Free-agent defensive lineman Jarvis Jenkins and nose tackle Steve McLendon signed deals March 16, helping the Jets offset the departure of nose tackle Damon Harrison, who signed with the Giants last week.Jenkins’ contract is for two years and $7 million, with $3 million guaranteed, according to a person with direct knowledge of the deal. The person spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because the Jets had not announced the signing.McLendon signed a three-year, $12 million deal, according to agent Richard Kopelman.The Jets also officially announced the re-signing of running back Bilal Powell, who agreed to terms on a three-year, $11.25 million deal last week.Jenkins, 27, had four sacks for Chicago last year after spending his first three NFL seasons with Washington. He was a second-round pick by the Redskins out of Clemson in 2011.Jenkins missed his rookie season after tearing a knee ligament in the preseason, but played in every game the next year.He was suspended the first four games of the 2013 season for violating the NFL’s policy on performance enhancing substances. Jenkins signed a one-year deal with Chicago last offseason, registering a single-season career high in sacks.Jenkins will help provide depth behind Muhammad Wilkerson, Sheldon Richardson and Leonard Williams.McLendon, 30, was signed by Pittsburgh as an undrafted free agent out of Troy in 2009, and has five career sacks. He is a run-stuffing presence up front who is the likely candidate to replace Harrison as the Jets’ starting nose tackle.McLendon was a backup for much of his first few seasons with the Steelers before he took over as a starter for five-time Pro Bowler Casey Hampton before the 2013 season. He has started 30 games over the past three years.(DENNIS WASZAK Jr., AP Sports Writer)last_img read more


Sammy Hagar To Be Honored By Adopt The Arts

first_imgOn Wednesday, January 31, 2018, Adopt The Arts (adoptthearts.org), the Los Angeles-based charity that preserves and creates arts programs in U.S. public schools, will honor rock icon Sammy Hagar (Van Halen, Chickenfoot) for his humanitarian work at their annual Rock Gala at the historic Avalon Ballroom in Hollywood.EMMY award winning actor Jane Lynch will host the epic night featuring once in a lifetime musical performances and a live auction with priceless experience packages that will help fund music programs in LAUSD elementary schools.Adopt The Arts Co-Founder, Grammy winner Matt Sorum (Guns N’ Roses, Velvet Revolver), will take the stage to salute Sammy Hagar with an all-star lineup of some of the biggest names in Rock N Roll including STEVE STEVENS, (Billy Idol), MICHAEL ANTHONY (Van Halen, The Circle), FRANKY PEREZ (Apocalyptica), DUFFY (The Cult), STEVE LUKATHER (Toto), KENNY ARONOFF (John Mellencamp), PHIL X (Bon Jovi), STEVE SALAS (Rod Stewart), and ROBERT DELEO and DEAN DELEO (Stone Temple Pilots).Tickets to the event are now on sale with prices ranging from $100-$500 each. For more information and to purchase tickets click here.ADOPT THE ARTS – a 501c3 non-profit funding arts programs in public elementary schools – was founded by musician Matt Sorum (Guns N’ Roses, Velvet Revolver) and activist Abby Berman and works to preserve arts programs in U.S. public schools. To raise awareness, ADOPT THE ARTS honors individuals who’ve had a long-lasting impact on music culture and who inspire young musicians to follow in their footsteps. Actress JANE LYNCH was the first celebrity to lend her support to ADOPT THE ARTS and is on the Board of Directors; the advisory board also includes: Slash, John Stamos, Billy Bob Thornton and more.According to Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD), 50% of elementary school children in the district are not receiving arts education of any kind. As in many school districts around the country, LAUSD has been slowly eroding its commitment to arts education, reducing the budget incrementally. The LAUSD district also estimates that 80% of its student body is living at or below the poverty line, which means the vast majority of these elementary school children will not have access to the arts outside of school.“Adopt the Arts was born out of the frustration for my own children losing education in the arts,” explains ADOPT THE ARTS Co-Founder Abby Berman. “When the system is failing, we have to take action. With influential people like my Co-Founder Matt Sorum adopting schools, we can preserve this valuable component to childhood development, which is also known to boost test scores. Because Federal and State funding is falling short, the responsibility is upon us as concerned parents and citizens to ensure we’re raising a new generation of healthy and well-rounded individuals.”ADOPT THE ARTS Co-Executive Director and Co-Founder Matt Sorum adds, “We’re starting in our own backyard here in Los Angeles, and we’ll continue to adopt schools across the nation. We believe that art is a universal and necessary language that unites us all, regardless of our backgrounds.”last_img read more