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‘CLOSED SEASON’ Visayan Sea fishing ban starts

first_img* Roxas City,Pilar, Pontevedra, President Roxas in Capiz; “Bawal gid angpagbaligya, pagbakal, position kagpagpanguha sang amo na nga species sang isda forthree months kay may penalties ka kon madakpan kaw,” Aparristressed. * E.B.Magalona, Victorias City, Manaplan, Sagay, Cadiz City, and Escalante City inNegros Island; The amended administrative orderspecifies the prohibitions and the corresponding penalties for the violatorslike imprisonment for six months to six years and fine of P6,000, depending onthe gravity of the offense. BFAR-6 director Remia Aparri said thethree-month period has been marked as the spawning season of pelagic fish species. The Visayan Sea, one of the country’slargest fishing grounds, is surrounded by the islands of Cebu and Negros to thesouth; Masbate to the north; Panay to the west; and Leyte to the east. According toAparri, all stakeholders should know of the significant intentions ofimplementing this policy. * Seas innorthern Iloilo from Barotac Nuevo towards Carles; “Nagapakita nga amoni ang period sang breedingor spawning season sang tatlo ka species nga isda. So, dapati-allow naton ang magagmay nga mga isda para magdalagku and i-allow natonang nagabusong, nagabihod nga isda para mag-contribute sang population dirasang isda sa Visayan Sea,” explained Aparri, citingscientific studies. ILOILO – Catching, trading, selling, andmarketing of sardines, herring and mackerel in the Visayan Sea are prohibitedfor three months. center_img According toAparri, the three-month fishing ban covers the following areas: The Bureau of Fisheries and AquaticResources (BFAR) in Western Visayas has enforced the “closed season” on Friday.The ban will end on Feb. 15 next year. “Nagapanawaganako liwat sa tanan nga stakeholders, sa aton mangingisda kag saaton nga local government units nga magbuylog anay kita forthree-months nga indi kamo magpanguha da sang involve nga fishspecies,” hambal ni Aparri. * BantayanIsland in Northern Cebu She enjoined local governmentofficials and coastal communities to cooperate with the bureau in its effort toconserve and protect the existing marine species at the Visayan Sea. “Very critical nga kon ma-manage or mapatumannaton ang  FAO No. 167-3 ngaamo ni closed season kayma-ensure naton nga maga-damoang amo ni klasi sang isda after three months and this willsupport sang aton population for fish for this generationand future generation,” she added. Aparri said they have intensifiedinformation drive by educating fishermen on the salient provisions of theFisheries Administrative Order (FAO) 167-3, the policy that establishes theannual closed season at the Visayan Sea. The BFAR-6chief also enjoined commercial fishing vessel operators to comply with thepolicy and avoid encroaching on the portion where fishing of the pelagicspecies has been banned./PNlast_img read more


Evans predicts brighter future

first_img Press Association The Manchester United defender has become an increasingly influential figure at international level during O’Neill’s first campaign, relishing the chance to establish himself at centre-half after filling in at left-back for much of his early career. And his enthusiasm for the Northern Irish cause is stronger than ever. Jonny Evans believes Northern Ireland are heading in the right direction under Michael O’Neill and is hopeful of an improved showing in Euro 2016 qualifying. Secondly, but on a related note, is the emergence of a new group of players. Shane Ferguson, Niall McGinn, Jamie Ward and Martin Paterson were all capped under Worthington but were largely peripheral figures, whereas O’Neill has sought to use them as first-team regulars, with promising results. “One thing I’ve noticed is that maybe in past people played out of position,” said Evans. “I played at left-back for a number of years and I was doing a job for the team but it was never a position I was comfortable in. “If you look now at the likes of Niall, Fergie, Wardy it’s better. “Wardy has had to wait for his turn and is only now playing regularly and that’s what we need. It’s great to have Shane on the left and Niall on the right, they really give us pace. “And we have competition at left-back, right-back, centre-back – where we are very strong – it’s a big factor to have that competition.” Having competed well against more illustrious opponents in the their last two matches, Tuesday night represents a different type of challenge. Although they are away from home, Northern Ireland will be expected to see Luxembourg off at the Stade Josy Barthel – the kind of task they have struggled with in recent years. Indeed, the reverse fixture ended in a 1-1 draw thanks to a late Luxembourg equaliser. “It won’t be bigger in terms of publicity as Portugal – beating them at home would have people talking about great nights at Windsor Park – but these are the games we haven’t done as well in, against teams at the same level as us or below,” he said. “The onus is on ourselves, you get a lot more time on the ball. “There is that pressure if we don’t produce or if we don’t score early, but if we stick to what we did well against Portugal, no matter what the opponent, I think we’ll be fine.” ends The side may have won just one of their seven matches in World Cup qualifying, a shock success over Fabio Capello’s Russia, but the mood around the team has been positive under O’Neill and two strong showings against Portugal – a 1-1 draw in Porto and Friday night’s unfortunate 4-2 defeat – offered further optimism. Hopes of a place at Rio next summer may have gone but Evans raised the prospect of a real challenge for the European Championships in France, when the number of participating teams increases from 16 to 24. “The extra teams are qualifying in the next campaign and that gives us a big incentive,” Evans said. “We need to go back to this campaign, finish as strong as we can and put points on the board. That might have an effect on the seedings and the draw for the next qualifying campaign. “We’re in a good place as a squad. It feels like we have things worked out a bit and if we can continue in that fashion there is that wee bit of hope. “There is a good spirit among the squad. You hear people saying ‘we enjoy it’ but we actually are enjoying it. It’s a good atmosphere.” Evans, speaking with new authority as one of the squad’s senior men, identifies two key reasons for the increasing feelgood factor that is developing around the side. First is O’Neill’s tendency to deploy players in their preferred positions – a simple call, perhaps, but one his predecessor Nigel Worthington often felt unable to make due to limited options. last_img read more


Ex-FEMA head takes blame, changing tune

first_imgMAMMOTH LAKES, Calif. – Ex-FEMA Director Michael Brown said Wednesday that he shared the blame for pre- and post-Katrina failures, saying he fell short in communicating the magnitude of the disaster and in calling for help. “I should have asked for the military sooner. I should have demanded the military sooner,” said Brown, the former head of the Federal Emergency Management Agency. “It was beyond the capacity of the state and local governments and it was beyond the capacity of FEMA,” he told a gathering of meteorologists at a ski resort in the Sierra Nevada. Brown said he failed to communicate the extent of the devastation to the media and to the federal government. FEMA came under fire immediately after Katrina struck the Louisiana and Mississippi coastlines Aug. 29, killing more than 1,300 in five states and leaving some 3,200 unaccounted for. He was relieved of his on-site command and recalled Sept. 9 to Washington, D.C. Brown resigned three days later, saying he feared he had become a distraction. Asked on Wednesday if he felt he had been railroaded out of his post, Brown replied, “I’m moving on.” He said his biggest concern was the current emphasis on reorganizing FEMA, particularly in light of past budget cuts that had left hundreds of vacancies in an agency with 2,500 employees. “It’s time to stop organizing and get FEMA back to what it was before – get its budget back up to where it was.” 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORESanta Anita opens winter meet Saturday with loaded card His statements changed his version of the events stated during a congressional hearing Sept. 27. At that time, he blamed most of the government’s failure to properly respond to the hurricane on Louisiana Gov. Kathleen Blanco and New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin – both Democrats. “I think it’s important to realize that all of us made mistakes,” he told The Associated Press in an interview after his speech. “After a while you get a different perspective. I still do believe that things weren’t working too well down there. I’m not into this whole thing of ‘let’s blame somebody for this or that.’ But let’s figure out what went wrong and what we can do to make it better next time.” He told attendees at the annual Operation Sierra Storm – a gathering of broadcast and National Weather Service meteorologists at snowy Mammoth Mountain Ski Area – that he failed to delegate responsibility and instead tried to attend to the details himself. “It was the largest natural disaster ever to strike the United States – 92,000 square miles. Logistics were falling apart,” he said. President George W. Bush appointed Brown to head FEMA in April 2003. He previously chaired the Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority, served on the City Council in Edmond, Okla., and practiced law in Oklahoma and Colorado. last_img read more