Browsing:

Tag: 爱上海DL

Notre Dame decks the halls for Christmas

first_imgWith lights lining the dining halls, Christmas music blasting out of windows and wreaths dotting the doors of buildings campus-wide, the only thing keeping Notre Dame from being a winter wonderland is the conspicuous lack of snow, though students are still decking the halls. McGlinn and O’Neill Halls put up large wreaths the week before Thanksgiving break. According to McGlinn rector Sister Mary Lynch, the wreath is a beloved tradition. “Our shamrock wreath was made by one of the McGlinn residents a few years ago,” Lynch said. “She made it with wire, and we had the maintenance shop back it with metal and hang it up each year since.” The wreaths, shaped like the McGlinn shamrock and the O’Neill “O,” are not necessarily Christmas themed, but Lynch finds them seasonally significant nonetheless. “We thought about keeping them up all year, but then it would lose its wintertime effect,” she said. Not content to have decorations exclusively outdoors, freshmen roommates Maggie Lawrence and Rachel Miceli of McGlinn Hall decorated their room on the first day back from Thanksgiving break. “We have Christmas lights up, gingerbread men across the window and paper chains in Christmas-inspired colors zigzagging across the ceiling,” Lawrence said. “Our entire section decorated, so there are giant paper snowflakes and ornaments dangling in the hallways,” Miceli said. “There are bells on the doorknob and giant red bows on the door too.” According to the maintenance office, trees have been set up in Bond Hall, O’Shaughnessy Hall, the Jordan Hall of Science, the Hesburgh Center, the Basilica, the Eck Visitor’s Center, the Main Building and the Stepan Hall of Chemistry. The individual departments purchase the ornaments and decorations, and maintenance teams have been working to set up the arrangements according to the departments’ instructions. Employees decorated the dining halls, and many hall council members oversaw the decorations for their respective dorms. Notable decorations beyond the wreaths on McGlinn and O’Neill Halls include the “Have a Phoxy Christmas” banner outside Pangborn Hall and the cutouts of Santa and Mrs. Claus in the lobby of Walsh Hall. Other campus traditions include Carroll Christmas, an annual Christmas party put on by the men of Carroll Hall, complete with a tree-lighting, a Glee Club performance and refreshments. Another major event is the Dillon Hall Light Show on South Quad, which begins with a performance Sunday at 7 p.m., another show at 9 p.m. and continued performances throughout the week. According to senior Thomas Catanach, one of the organizers, about 6,000 LED lights are used to create the show. “Basically, we have a bunch of strands of Christmas lights suspended from the building and divided into different sectors,” Catanach said. “The sectors are choreographed to Christmas songs, and it’s all coordinated by computer.” Although impending finals can add great stress to the last few weeks of the semester, many students said they refuse to let them put a damper on their holiday joy. “We make up for the sadness and stress that finals bring by decorating and celebrating Christmas,” Miceli said.last_img read more


Pentagon surplus handouts stoke the militarization of US police

first_imgSmall-town police armed for war As soon as protests began in Minneapolis, the city’s troubled police department rolled out armored vehicles appearing more suited to Middle East battlefields.Other large cities have them too, but also small towns.In 2013 police in Flathead County, Montana, which has 90,000 residents nestled near the scenic Glacier National Park, received a landmine-resistant armored vehicle, one year after taking delivery of a military transport. When US police flooded the streets around the country to confront protesters two weeks ago, for many it appeared like the army had deployed, with camouflage uniforms and combat gear, heavily armored anti-mine vehicles, and high-powered assault weapons. That’s not by accident. For years the US Defense Department has been handing its surplus equipment over for free to police departments — and the departments, large and small, have revelled in it.Critics say it has been part of the overall militarization of the police, and helped fuel mass nationwide demonstrations against police abuse and deadly tactics that began after the May 25 killing of a handcuffed African American, George Floyd, by a Minneapolis police officer. The 10-person (two only part-time) police department in Ada, Oklahoma, population 16,000, got their mine-resistant armored car in July 2019, after stockpiling 34 M-16 assault rifles over the years.  In a country where many people have their own guns and where schools have suffered mass shootings, even local education districts are taking advantage of the Pentagon’s handouts.The 47 primary and secondary schools of the Bay District in Panama City, Florida acquired no less than 27 assault rifles and two mine-resistant armored vehicles in 2012 and 2013.Trump restarted giveaway The “1033” Pentagon surplus program has existed for years. Since 1997, the US military has distributed used and new equipment ranging from handguns to helicopters to armored vehicles, worth around $8.6 billion, to more than 8,000 federal, tribal and local police forces, according to the US Congress. In 2015 President Barack Obama severely limited the program, but his successor Donald Trump restored it in 2017.That year alone, some 500 million pieces of military equipment were transferred to the country’s police services under the 1033 program.But the recent anti-police protests have recharged efforts to stop it.This week around 200 lawmakers in Congress, mostly Democrats, sponsored a bill, the “Stop Militarizing Law Enforcement Act”, to again reel in the program.The bill, in the House of Representatives, would strictly limit the transfer of guns, ammunition, grenades, explosives, certain kinds of vehicles, and drones and other aircraft designed for the battlefield.A parallel bill is being prepared in the Senate, pushed by Democrat Brian Schatz, who has fought against over-arming the police for years.”It is clear that many police departments are being outfitted as if they are going to war, and it is not working in terms of maintaining the peace,” Schatz told The New York Times. “Just because the Department of Defense has excess weaponry doesn’t mean it will be put to good use.”Schatz and Republican Senator Rand Paul attempted to push through a similar law in 2014, after the first publication of details of the 1033 program, amid the riots over police brutality against African-Americans in Ferguson, Missouri. The protests and riots that broke out over the police shooting of 18-year-old Michael Brown were met by police officers carrying assault rifles and driving armored cars they got from the Pentagon. Topics :last_img read more


Croatia beat Denmark in dramatic shoot-out

first_img0Shares0000Croatia players leap off in celebration after Ivan Rakitic’s penalty sent them to the World Cup quarter finals. PHOTO/FIFANIZHNIY NOVGOROD, Russia, Jul 1- Goalkeeper Danijel Subasic was the hero as Croatia squeezed into the World Cup quarter-finals with a penalty shoot-out victory over Denmark here Sunday.On a night of late, late drama Ivan Rakitic stroked home the decisive spotkick to ensure the Croats advanced to a last eight meeting with Russia after the two sides finished locked at 1-1 following extra-time. The Barcelona midfielder’s winner came after Milan Badelj and Josip Pivaric saw their penalties saved by Danish goalkeeper Kasper Schmeichel, who also saved an extra time penalty from Luka Modric.But Danes Christian Eriksen, Lasse Schone and Nicolai Jorgensen were thwarted by Subasic in the shootout to ensure Croatia won 3-2 and advanced to their first quarter-finals since the 1998 World Cup in France.The dramatic ending followed early excitement — but little in between.In an astonishing start to the match, both teams scored within four minutes via their first attacks.First, Mathias Jorgensen turned home in the second minute after Croatia failed to clear a long throw-in from Jonas Knudsen, the defender’s shot creeping under Subasic to give Denmark the perfect start.But any hopes they could hold onto their lead vanished within 90 seconds.With the Nizhny Novgorod stadium still rocking from the frantic start, Croatia went upfield and promptly equalised.Action between Croatia and Denmark in the World Cup last 16Again, the goal owed more than a little to bad defending when a Sime Vrsaljko cross was hammered by Henrik Dalsgaard into fellow Dane Andreas Christensen and the ball fell obligingly in the penalty area to Mario Mandzukic who scored.The explosive start — both sides hit the back of the net within three minutes and thirty seven seconds — was officially the quickest two teams have ever scored in a World Cup finals match.The following 116 minutes though largely failed to live up to the first four, fireworks giving way to a damp squib of an encounter as the game edged inexorably towards extra time and penalties.Billed as a clash between the opposing number 10s, Modric and Eriksen, it instead became increasingly attritional and tactical, with both playmakers unable to find any space.Instead the player who created most chances was Knudsen with his long throws.Few clear chances were created by either side until Modric’s late penalty miss.That came after Ante Rebic was fouled in the 116th minute Mathias Jorgensen, with the goal at his mercy.Modric stepped up but side-footed weakly and Schmeichel made the first of his three penalty saves on the night, all in vain, as his legendary goalkeeping father Peter punched the air in delight as he watched on in the stands.0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more