Browsing:

Tag: 爱上海E

Archery Champs

first_imgGeorgia 4-H’ers from Jackson County hit the mark and brought home a national title in the junior division at the 4-H Buckmaster’s Invitational held Aug. 14-17 in Montgomery, Ala.Six 4-H members participated in three tournaments during the competition. The team earned 15 place awards in the junior division and five overall place awards.Jackson County’s 4-H Archery team was formed in 2000 and has continued to grow each year. Keri Hobbs, University of Georgia Extension coordinator, became the team’s 4-H agent a little more than two years ago. Having worked with the 4-H archery team in Sumter County before relocating to Jackson County, Hobbs understands the importance of 4-H archery and what participation can do for the students.“Kids and their parents as well are looking for extracurricular activities to get involved in something positive, and 4-H is very positive. A majority of the girls (on the team), if not all of them, started shooting archery because of the opportunity through 4-H,” Hobbs said.Hobbs and the team’s six coaches view archery as much more than just a sport.“The archery team grew tremendously because of the support of our coaches. Kids learn more than shooting. The coaches are changing lives by building confidence and character,” she said.Currently, the Jackson County 4-H archery team has 51 shooters on their roster. More than half of the team is female.Growing group The team is comprised of students age 9-18 from all backgrounds which proves how important teamwork and community really are, Hobbs said. Second year archery coach Michael Reynolds personally witnesses the growth and maturity the students experience through the team. Hobbs says Reynolds’ enthusiasm and excitement for the sport and the students are the reasons the team has doubled in size. “I’ve got kids of all shapes, forms, home life and everything. 4-H builds character, forms discipline and builds social skills. Our job, as instructors, is to morally pick them up, give them encouragement in everything they do. We do what we do because we do make a difference in these kids’ lives,” Reynolds said.Jackson County was the only Georgia team that competed in the Buckmaster’s Invitational. Almost 100 individuals were registered in the junior division with targets ranging from five to 30 yards away.“This was a great experience for our junior age group and it was a big deal being in front of crowds. It was nerve wracking for them, too,” said Reynolds who advised the team to “block everything else out.”His advice worked.And the winners are..Kaycie Malcolm, a seventh grade student at East Jackson Middle School, was awarded the second high individual shooter. Eighth grade Commerce Middle School student Bethany Arnold placed third. Bree Reynolds, an eighth grade student from EJMS, won fourth. Marissa Fullard, an eighth grade student from EJMS, placed seventh, and seventh grade EJMS student Maddie Fowler claimed eighth place overall.In the FITA (World Archery Federation) competition, sixth grade West Jackson Middle School student Lillie Woodall won eighth in the individual division.Jackson County 4-H will begin its 2014-2015 archery season on Tuesday, Oct. 7.For more information about the 4-H Archery team in your county, contact your local UGA Extension Office at 1-800-ASK-UGA1.last_img read more


Common Sense Talk About Sexual Harassment

first_img Share 65 Views   no discussions Every woman I know of a certain age remembers being sexually harassed. Except we didn’t call it sexual harassment way back then. We remembered the time when guys–our co-workers, our customers, and, yes, our bosses—were often making passes, hitting on us, telling an off-color joke, saying a lot of suggestive things, endlessly trying it on. And, yes, a lot of times it was upsetting and most of the time demeaning. Once in a while, maybe, even frightening, especially if one was young or felt insecure and powerless and really, really needed the job or wanted the promotion.And at the same time, let’ s not forget, there were women who turned sexual harassment around and used it to their own advantage. It was called sleeping your way to the top. A lot of very smart, very capable women, some of whom are now very respected and admired women of a certain age, did exactly that though, of course, they would now deny it. But most of us just said no or laughed it off, and most guys took no for an answer and maybe went on and tried with someone else and didn’t hold it against us. Yes, you thought less of him and for all I know, he might have thought more of you for slapping his hands away or telling him how much you liked his wife and his adorable kiddies when he was trying to pull you close. But the awkward moment was between the two of you. You didn’t complain to H.R. You didn’t file a lawsuit. And if you really did have a pig of a boss who was that unrelentingly aggressive, you knew you had to find another job because you realized it wasn’t smart to work in a place that would let such a jerk have power. Of course the reason my friends and I were talking again about sexual harassment was because of the accusations against Herman Cain. And though a couple said it just shows that guys in power never learn, most thought the women making the accusations were not the most appealing examples of woman-as-victim. The blonde from Chicago with a cloudy past seemed just too eager for her press conference moment. And the other seems to be a serial plaintiff who thinks recompense for possible sexual harassment is a free year at Harvard. What’s more, these days men can be as vulnerable to charges of sexual harassment as women are vulnerable to being harassed. Maybe, in some ways, even more so. If a young man works in almost any company today and a woman reports that he is harassing her, whether it is true or not, the guy is usually fired. It is not worth the trouble for most companies to find out the truth.They are more afraid of the woman suing, the automatic sympathy she would get, and the enormous legal expenses the company would entail. Far easier to dump the man, sidetrack his career, and seem so very protective of a woman’s rights. And when the man, who is accused, is in a powerful position, it is easier to just pay off the woman in some way than fight her in court. It may leave a shadow on him but it saves a lot of big lawyer’s bills. Was it better the way it used to be? No, of course not.There was tolerance of what was truly unacceptable behavior. But it is still far from perfect now. These days the assumption seems to be that women are so vulnerable and defenseless they always need a lawsuit and a payoff to protect them from even questionable behavior. Rather than–in most cases– simply having the good sense to say, “Cut it out.” Myrna Blyth is editor-in-chief of ThirdAge. LifestyleRelationships Common Sense Talk About Sexual Harassment by: – November 16, 2011 Sharecenter_img Sharing is caring! Share Tweetlast_img read more