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HAA recognizes outstanding alums

first_imgThe Harvard Alumni Association (HAA) announced that Thomas G. Everett, Roger W. Ferguson Jr. ’73, A.M. ’78, J.D. ’79, Ph.D. ’81, John H. McArthur, M.B.A. ’59, D.B.A. ’63, and Betsey Bradley Urschel, Ed.M. ’63, will receive the 2016 Harvard Medal. President Drew Faust will award the medals at Commencement during the Annual Meeting of the Harvard Alumni Association. First awarded in 1981, the Harvard Medal recognizes extraordinary service to the University. The service can range across diverse aspects of University life — from teaching, leadership, and innovation to fundraising, administration, and volunteerism.Thomas G. EverettThomas G. Everett embodies and spreads the Harvard spirit through his gift for teaching and love of making music. He came to Harvard in 1971 to direct the Harvard University Band. After four decades of coordinating and conducting formal concerts, Commencements, diplomatic greetings, trumpet fanfares, athletic events, and ceremonial music, he stepped down in 2013. He is currently director emeritus of the Harvard Bands.Everett pioneered the jazz program at Harvard — not only through the performing groups he organized and conducted, including the Harvard Jazz Bands, Harvard Wind Ensemble, and Harvard Summer Pops Band, but also by teaching courses in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences and at Harvard Extension School. He has served as jazz adviser to the Office for the Arts, a collaboration that has resulted in expanded music opportunities for students.A critical presence and source of support for various alumni musical groups, including the Harvard Alumni Jazz Band and the Harvard Band Foundation, Everett established relationships with a broad alumni base. He has given personal lessons to alumni and has served as a nexus for the Harvard Band’s extended alumni network. He founded and coordinated the Harvard Club of Boston’s Annual Horblit Jazz Combo Festival.He holds degrees from Ithaca College and studied privately at the Eastman School of Music. He and his wife, Betsy, live in Lexington, Mass.Roger W. Ferguson Jr. ’73, A.M. ’78, J.D. ’79, Ph.D. ’81Roger W. Ferguson Jr. has exhibited a profound commitment to Harvard. President of the Board of Overseers from 2008 to 2009, he also served as a member of the executive committee, chaired the standing committee on institutional policy, sat on the board’s standing committees on social sciences and alumni affairs and development, and chaired the governing boards’ Joint Committee on Inspection, Harvard’s audit committee. A member of the University Library and the Law School visiting committees, he also chaired the Memorial Church visiting committee. During his tenure as an Overseer, he also served on search committees for members of the Corporation. He was an elected director of the Harvard Alumni Association in the late 1990s.Former vice chairman of the Federal Reserve Board of Governors, Ferguson is now the president and chief executive officer of retirement services provider TIAA (formerly TIAA-CREF). A member of President Obama’s Economic Recovery Advisory Board, his leadership has been recognized by many different organizations; this recognition includes the Visionary Award from the Council for Economic Education and an honorary fellowship at Pembroke College.Ferguson is married to Annette Nazareth, a partner at Davis Polk and former commissioner of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. They have a son and a daughter and live in Washington, D.C.John H. McArthur, M.B.A. ’59, D.B.A. ’63John H. McArthur has made a major impact on Harvard Business School (HBS) and the University at large. He is respected by various sectors of Harvard for his involvement in an array of areas, from athletics to politically nuanced dealings with the city of Boston. He joined the HBS faculty in 1962 and served as dean of the faculty from 1980 through 1995. Since then he has been the George F. Baker Professor of Business Administration Emeritus and dean emeritus. He is currently an honorary chair of the Harvard Business School Campaign and a member of the Social Enterprise Initiative Advisory Board.A true Harvard citizen, McArthur has served multiple Schools; he has been a member of the Board of Overseers of Harvard Medical School (HMS) and a member of the Dean’s Councils of the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He was founding co-chair of the board of trustees of Partners HealthCare System, which brought together two leading HMS-affiliated teaching hospitals, Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) and Massachusetts General Hospital. BWH honored his legacy by establishing the John McArthur Program for Medicine Leadership Track, which enables residents to earn their M.B.A. from HBS during their residency at the hospital.A member of the Harvard Club of Boston and the Harvard Club of New York City, McArthur was a recipient of the Harvard Statesman Award from the HBS Club of New York and the Canadian Business Leadership Award from the combined HBS Clubs of Canada. In 1996, he was selected as honorary coach of the men’s ice hockey team at Harvard College and as a member of the Harvard Varsity Club.The John and Natty McArthur University Professorship was established at Harvard University in 1997, and McArthur Hall was dedicated at HBS in 1999. A group of Canadian alumni announced the creation of the John H. McArthur Canadian Fellowship program in 2002.A native of Vancouver, British Columbia, McArthur lives with his wife, Natty, in Weston, Mass.Betsey Bradley Urschel, Ed.M. ’63Betsey Bradley Urschel cares deeply about Harvard and has demonstrated her devotion to the University through many years of gracious and exemplary volunteer service. A past president and director emerita of the Harvard Club of Dallas, she was co-chair of the Club’s centennial celebration in 2014, which coincided with the Your Harvard: Texas event in Dallas. She and her husband, Harold C. Urschel, M.D. ’55, who passed away in 2012, founded the Betsey Bradley and Hal Urschel M.D. Community Service Fund, which provides financial assistance to a Harvard College undergraduate pursuing a public service internship in the North Texas region.A recipient of the HAA Alumni Award in 2005, Urschel has served in a number of different capacities for the HAA, including as an elected director, regional director for Texas, and vice president of University affairs of the HAA Board of Directors. She served on the HAA Committee to Nominate Overseers and Elected Directors and on the HAA Awards Committee, and she has been an alumni interviewer.Committed to women, Urschel was a member of the Women’s Leadership Board of the Women and Public Policy Program of Harvard Kennedy School. She is also an Alley-Sheridan Scholar and fellow of the Thoracic Surgery Foundation for Research and Education. In addition, she served on the advisory board for Harvard Medical School’s “50 Years of Women in Medicine at Harvard” celebration.She continues to live in Dallas and remains involved with local Harvard-related efforts and the HAA Board.last_img read more


Harry Kane at the double as Tottenham brush aside West Ham

first_img With West Ham unquestionably beaten, Walker’s goal, from inside the area in the 83rd minute, resembled one more likely to be seen in training. Casually exchanging a one-two with Son that began outside the penalty box, the full-back masterfully bent the ball with the outside of his right foot into the bottom corner. Equally casually, he then gave Lanzini possession four minutes later in defence, allowing the midfielder to run into the area and beat Hugo Lloris by finishing high inside the near left post. Conceding will understandably have frustrated Pochettino, but while much has been said about his team’s promise so far this season, on this evidence there remains more to come. TWEET OF THE MATCH Gary Lineker ‏@GaryLineker This is the most promising Spurs outfit for many a year. Pochettino has got them bang on! https://twitter.com/GaryLineker/status/668481510622797824 PLAYER RATINGS Tottenham Hugo Lloris: 6 (out of 10) Kyle Walker: 7 Toby Alderweireld: 8 Jan Vertonghen: 7 Danny Rose: 7 Eric Dier: 7 Dele Alli: 6 Mousa Dembele: 8 Christian Eriksen: 7 Son Heung-min: 7 Harry Kane: 8 Subs Ryan Mason (for Alli, 71): 6 Josh Onomah (for Son, 86): 5 Tom Carroll (for Kane, 91) 5 West Ham Adrian: 7 Carl Jenkinson: 4 Winston Reid: 5 James Tomkins: 4 Aaron Cresswell: 4 Mark Noble: 5 Cheikhou Kouyate: 6 Diafra Sakho: 5 Manuel Lanzini: 7 Victor Moses: 6 Andy Carroll: 6 Subs Nikica Jelavic(for Moses, 63): 5 Mauro Zarate (for Carroll, 63): 6 Alex Song (for Noble, 80): 5 STAR PLAYER Harry Kane: His double means it is now eight goals in five games for the Tottenham striker, who could have had a hat-trick had he slotted a one-on-one in the first half. Undeterred, Kane managed another rousing display and looks firmly back to his best. MOMENT OF THE MATCH La Marseillaise played out around White Hart Lane before kick-off in tribute to the victims of the Paris terrorist attacks and there was a moving show of support from the Spurs fans towards their goalkeeper and France captain Hugo Lloris. Lloris received a standing ovation from the home fans behind the goal and at full-time,expressed his gratitude by clapping all sides of the ground. VIEW FROM THE BENCH Mauricio Pochettino will be delighted with another confident display from his side and he was even afforded the luxury of resting Alli, Kane and Son in the second half, with a six-hour trip to Qarabag to come in the Europa League on Thursday. Slaven Bilic’s men looked a pale shadow of the disciplined team that beat Arsenal, Liverpool and Manchester City earlier this season. MOAN OF THE MATCH Dele Alli has enjoyed a brilliant start to the season but the 19-year-old was less influential playing further forward behind Kane. With Tottenham 3-0 up, he picked up a needless booking for an altercation with Mark Noble and will now miss Tottenham’s game against Chelsea next Sunday. WHO’S UP NEXT Qarabag v Tottenham (Europa League, Thursday, 26 November) West Ham v West Brom (Premier League, Sunday, 29 November) Man of the match Kane said on Sky Sports: “I enjoy the atmosphere of these games, especially when we’re at home. The crowd were incredible, they got right behind us, and we put in a good performance.” Tottenham have lost just once in this Premier League campaign, but Eric Dier tempered expectations. “We’re going game by game, we’re not going to get excited,” he said. “We’re going to keep doing what we’ve been doing since the beginning of the season. If you ask any Spurs player, that’s what they’d tell you. We’ll keep on trying to perform as we’ve been doing, work hard, and we know that if we perform like we did today then we’re going to get wins and push right at the top, so we just need to do that.” Pochettino, the Spurs boss, saluted his team’s display. “It was a high level of performance. It was fantastic, I’m very proud of the players,” he said. “The way we played today, we showed how we can play, and we need to perform like that all season. “I never had a doubt about Harry Kane. It’s difficult sometimes to score in every game but Harry is top. We have a very good squad, I’m very happy in the way we work every day.” They consistently outplayed their visitors as two goals from Harry Kane and one each from Toby Alderweireld and Kyle Walker took them within two points of joint-third-placed Arsenal and Manchester City and three ahead of sixth-placed West Ham, whose goal came from Manuel Lanzini. Son Hueng-min returned to Tottenham’s starting XI in the absence of the suspended Erik Lamela, while West Ham, for the coming three months without the injured and important Dmitri Payet, started with Andy Carroll, Victor Moses and Diafra Sakho. Following his outstanding recent goal for England against France, much of the early attention inevitably centred on Dele Alli and the midfielder – curiously switching with Mousa Dembele from his usually-deeper position to No 10 – was central to Spurs’ opening goal. Receiving possession from Son in the 23rd minute, Alli found room to shoot from inside the area but watched as Winston Reid deflected the ball to Kane, who in one motion classily turned Carl Jenkinson before shooting with his left foot beyond goalkeeper Adrian into the roof of the net. It could easily have already been more. With West Ham defending from a deep position amid Spurs’ intensity, Christian Eriksen had previously tested Adrian with a powerful strike from midfield and the visitors’ Cheikhou Kouyate, albeit from an offside position that went unnoticed, had hit the crossbar with a bicycle kick. The momentum theirs, Spurs continued to threaten and within 10 minutes had doubled their lead. From a corner on the left, Eriksen delivered a typically-accurate, inswinging cross which Alderweireld read to routinely head in from close range. Kane soon should have scored a third when one-on-one with Adrian after Alli’s through-ball, but despite time and space the forward showed an uncharacteristic lack of composure to shoot with his weaker left foot and miss the target by considerable distance. Had he done so, it would have been difficult to see any way West Ham could have recovered from such a half-time deficit. It said much about the inaccuracy of suggestions that they can compete with Spurs for a place in the top four when they were so visibly an inferior team. The only chance they had came in scoring the second half’s first goal, and ideally soon after the restart, but Mauricio Pochettino’s Spurs are a more ruthless team than has been seen under his predecessors, and they instead swiftly sealed victory. Maintaining their aggressive, high-paced football, they immediately attacked and then took advantage when James Tomkins thoughtlessly conceded possession with a misplaced pass to Eriksen. With West Ham’s defence out of position, the midfielder played in Kane, and he atoned for his earlier error by shooting past the exposed Adrian into the bottom left corner to score his eighth goal in his past five Spurs games. Tottenham demonstrated their Champions League credentials with a convincing 4-1 Premier League home defeat of West Ham that exposed their London rivals as pretenders at that level. 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Cabin fever and comedians – life in the World Cup bubble

first_imgContact with family is usually strictly controlled or non-existent, leaving the young men cooped up for weeks, rubbing shoulders with the same teammates day after day.Australia coach Bert van Marwijk admits it can be a recipe for disaster if cabin fever takes hold, causing factionalism or infighting among the squad.In 2010, the Dutchman managed to unite the notoriously fractious Netherlands enough to reach the World Cup final, despite the presence of several big personalities who each wanted to be pack leader.Thomas Mueller says Germany’s Euro 2012 squad was divided © AFP/File / Odd ANDERSEN“I told the Holland players in 2010, we will get bored. But we have to win the World Cup, we have to work together,” he told Sydney’s Daily Telegraph.Van Marwijk said a major part of maintaining harmony was making players understand they had to respect one another, even if they might never be friends.“Everyday a few small things happen and those things are very important for the atmosphere in the whole group,” he said.“You cannot find it in any book, it’s the way you lead the group, manage the group.”– Club v country –Club rivalries can emerge, such as those which in the past have created splits in the Spain team between Barcelona and Real Madrid players.Thomas Mueller admitted Germany divided into Bayern Munich and Borussia Dortmund blocs at Euro 2012 but denied a similar schism was behind their opening-round loss to Mexico at the current tournament in Russia.“We didn’t have the best kind of chemistry back then, but it is totally different today,” he insisted.Sometimes players fed up with their camp routine take desperate measures.Former England forward Jermain Defoe was so mind-numbingly bored at England’s 2010 base in South Africa that he watched strike partner Wayne Rooney’s entire wedding video from beginning to end.Years later, details of Rooney’s nuptials remained seared into his brain.“Wayne had something like a flash mob, the waiters were singing, dancing, if I can remember,” he said.“Yeah, you do get bored, but all the teams get bored.”England seem to have learned their lesson and have tried to make their current camp at Repino, outside Saint Petersburg, a relaxed, fun environment.– Climbing the walls –England’s siege mentality of the past has eased as Gareth Southgate’s men race inflatable unicorns in the pool and engage in darts competitions with the media.Iceland are taking a similar approach, flying in a group of comedians to give the players a boost.Wayne Rooney’s wedding video helped keep boredom at bay for former England forward Jermain Defoe in 2010 © AFP/File / Justin TALLIS“The team is here for the long haul and we are in it together. It is important to keep us all fresh and do something entirely different every now and then,” said team spokesman Omar Smarason.World Cup boredom can lead to players literally climbing the walls to get away from camp and blow off some steam, and it’s not a new phenomenon.Former Mexico goalkeeper Antonio “Tota” Carbajal recalled how at the 1966 tournament in England two players sneaked away to a bar — with coach Ignacio Trelles hot on their heels to drag them back.Carbajal, a veteran of five World Cups, argued players behaving badly was not necessarily a bad thing.“These things unite the team,” the 89-year-old told AFP.A laid-back approach certainly worked for the late Denmark coach Richard Moller Nielsen, who gave his players unprecedented freedom — including visits to fast-food outlets — during their victorious run at Euro 92.“Perhaps it would be a good idea if we drink a beer and drive past McDonald’s now and then. I will suggest that to the coach,” current Denmark defender Jannik Vestergaard suggested, perhaps a touch wistfully.0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today) 0Shares0000England coach Gareth Southgate has taken a relaxed approach with his squad at the World Cup in Russia © AFP / Paul ELLISMOSCOW, Russian Federation, Jun 24 – World Cup footballers often face an unexpected hurdle as they try to cope with the intense scrutiny and pressure of the game’s biggest showpiece — it can be boring… really, really boring.In the periods between matches, players are isolated at remote training camps in the countryside, surrounded by tight security and high walls to discourage prying eyes.last_img read more