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ND8 holds fundraiser at Five Guys

first_imgND8, a student group fighting poverty in the Third World, hoped to lure students away from the dining halls Wednesday and over to Eddy Street to support a fundraising event held at Five Guys. Ten percent of proceeds from sales between 5 p.m. and 10 p.m. benefitted Second Chance, a Toledo, Ohio based organization supporting the victims of domestic sex trafficking. Sophomore Erin Hattler, ND8 co-president, said the organization aims to combat trafficking through advocacy. “Second Chance is a social service program that provides comprehensive services to victims of domestic sex trafficking and prostitution, specializing in women and children,” Hattler said. “It focuses on raising community awareness, and trying to end exploitation through advocacy, securing resources for treatment and training for first responders.” Sophomore John Gibbons, co-president of ND8, said the group chose Second Chance because it directly addresses the challenges that trap victims in the cycle of trafficking. “Often, victims of sex trafficking are likely to go back into sex trafficking because they don’t know what else to do, and there aren’t enough resources devoted to helping them,” Gibbons said. “Second Chance provides a place where they can get away from everything, eventually brining them back to society and something of a normal life.” Bill Purcell, associate director for Catholic Social Tradition and Practice at the Center for Social Concerns, came to eat at Five Guys to support ND8’s efforts. “Our whole family came to support the work against human trafficking, which often gets hidden in today’s society,” Purcell said. “This was a great way to benefit the local community’s economy, to get something to eat and to help the universal problem of human trafficking.” Freshman Erin O’Brien confessed to having dual motives for eating dinner at Five Guys. “It’s for a good cause and a good excuse to go get great food off campus,” she said. Hesburgh Library librarian Elizabeth Van Jacob brought her daughter Jemma to Five Guys in support of the event. Jemma, a student at John Adams High School, said she was glad to see the issue being addressed. “While studying through home schooling a few years ago, I read about this issue,” Jemma Van Jacob said. “It’s good to act locally to tackle this issue.” Elizabeth Van Jacob said the gravity of the problem demands attention. “I can’t believe that this issue is still going on and that it’s going on in the United States,” Elizabeth said. “This affects a lot of adolescent girls and boys, and we are completely opposed to this sort of violence.”last_img read more


ColorMax Violas

first_imgMake no mistake about it, if you have ever felt like a viola couldn’t dazzle like a pansy, then you haven’t tried ColorMax. ColorMax is a relatively new series of viola that comes to us from Sakata Seed and has completely shocked me with its flower power. It really is color to the max with these violas.Know that I am the ultimate pansy and viola lover, almost to the point of saying that I have never seen one I didn’t like. I love clear ones, those with blotches, those with whiskers, and I relish their fragrance. To me, there is nothing not to love about pansies and violas.ColorMax comes in 10 colors and a mix, and it’s hard to pick out a favorite. The clear yellow is so prolific I would hardly be exaggerating when I say it can be seen from a mile away. Just think: I am saying that about violas and not giant or mammoth-sized pansies. Speaking of giant, Sakata is the same company that brings us the Majestic Giant series.‘Icy Blue,’ ‘Popcorn’ and ‘Lemon Splash’ are also must-have plants for your cool-season landscape. While these flowers are larger than many other viola selections, the quantity of blossoms is amazing. As you might expect, the plants reach 6 to 8 inches tall with a spread of about 10 inches. ColorMax violas are very cold-tolerant and transplant to the garden with ease.Select a site in full sun or partial shade with organically rich soil. If organic, rich and fertile doesn’t sound like your soil, don’t fret. Over the last 20 years, most gardeners I have talked to are plagued with a tight clay or heavy soil. Clay particles are the smallest of all soils. Because of their small size, they are easier to compact, keeping out not only water but also air.So we have choices, such as going with a landscape mix like the commercial landscaper or simply working in organic matter. Your flower success starts at ground level. By incorporating organic matter like humus, compost or peat into native soil, good things start to happen. Organic matter helps to loosen the soil for better water penetration and aeration, leading to good root development.Here in the Savannah area, there are a lot of gardeners with sandy soil that seems to drain like a wire basket. In this situation, the same organic matter helps hold water and nutrients. Remember that soil improvement is a continual process.For a really show-stopping display, plant a large group of single-colored, 24-inch-tall snapdragons, such as rose-colored Sonnets or Liberties, to the back of the bed with a mass of ‘Clear Yellow’ or ‘Lemon Splash’ ColorMax violas in front. Or reverse and use yellow snapdragons in the back and ‘Icy Blue’ or ‘Berry Pie’ ColorMax violas in front. Use them also in mixed containers with colorful foliage plants like ‘Lemon Ball’ sedum, ‘Red Giant’ mustard or ‘Redbor’ kale.No matter where you live, there is a season for pansies and violas. In the South, that season is now. As you shop, keep your eyes open for ColorMax, the most exciting new viola series in years. Follow me on Twitter: @CGBGgardenguru.last_img read more


Lyndon State College offers new Performing Arts Management degree

first_imgLyndon State College is announcing a new degree. The Bachelor of Science in Performing Arts Management will first be offered in the fall of 2010. Students majoring in Arts Management can select among three concentrations: artist management, venue management and theater operations management.The Performing Arts Management degree will prepare students to serve in administrative, managerial and leadership positions in an area related to music and performing arts. Core courses include Financial Accounting, Introduction to Business, Introduction to Business Software, Principles of Management, Principles of Marketing, Business Ethics, Fiscal Management, Event Management and Promotion, Strategic Media Communication and Introduction to Media Communication. All students will also complete Lyndon’s General Education requirements, which are specifically designed and intended to provide a basis of liberal arts for all Lyndon students.In addition, students must meet the requirements of the career-related internship after participating in courses such as the Music Industry Co-op, Event Management and Promotion, Artist Management and Development, Music Venue Management, Entrepreneurship in the Music Industry, House and Box Office Management and Theatre Operations Management Techniques. All of these courses are designed to integrate real-world experience with classroom instruction.Two current faculty members will be central in this new program: Britt Moore and Joe Gittleman. Both came to Lyndon following extensive experience in the industry. Moore worked in California as a sound engineer, and Gittleman is the founder and member of the Mighty Mighty Bosstones, a successful Boston-based band founded in 1983.As with most Lyndon courses, Arts Management students will “do” what they study – they will not be isolated in the classroom, but will be exposed to the demands of an actual work environment. The motto of the Music & Performing Arts and Arts Management departments is “Be early, work hard, say thanks.”Upon graduation, students will be prepared to enter a career with a balance of knowledge in a field associated with music business or theater arts management. There has been a growing trend over the years of students opting for professional courses in their college education. At this time, 65% of Lyndon students are enrolled in such programs.Source: Lyndon State College 3.29.2010last_img read more


MMH plans healthy heart dinner

first_imgDr. Jason SmithBatesville, In. — On Wednesday, May 9, Margaret Mary Health will hold a healthy heart dinner and presentation featuring Dr. Jason Smith, who will provide information about Congestive Heart Failure, including the cause, symptoms and treatment options.Doors will open at 5:00 PM, with the dinner buffet beginning at 5:30 PM at The Sherman, located in downtown Batesville. Cost is $9 per person. RSVP is required by Wednesday, May 2 and can be made by calling 812.933.5115. Payments will be accepted at the door.Cutline: Dr. Smith is board certified in Internal Medicine and Cardiovascular Disease and has been voted one of Cincinnati’s ‘Top Doctors’ by his peers in Cincinnati Magazine in 2008, 2013 and 2015. He has been seeing patients at Margaret Mary since 2004.last_img