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Ghost Light, Featuring Tom Hamilton & Holly Bowling, Makes East Coast Debut In Brooklyn [Photos/Video]

first_imgLoad remaining images On Wednesday evening, Ghost Light, the new project featuring Tom Hamilton, Holly Bowling, Steve Lyons, Raina Mullen, and Scotty Zwang, made their highly anticipated East Coast debut at Brooklyn Bowl with support from Colorado jam quartet Magic Beans. Hamilton, in particular, is no stranger to the Brooklyn, NY venue, having played there dozens of times with Joe Russo’s Almost Dead and other acts. That comfort with the room coupled with the excitement each of the players clearly feels toward this new project was readily apparent throughout the show.EXCLUSIVE: Tom Hamilton & Holly Bowling Talk New Band, Ghost Light, & The Grateful DeadGhost Light’s two-set headlining show was excitedly received by a particularly eager Wednesday crowd, as the band worked through various composed pieces (both instrumental and with vocals) as well as deep, exploratory stretches of improv. They even threw in a cover of The Grateful Dead‘s “Jack Straw” as the encore for good measure. Watch the cover below:Ghost Light – “Jack Straw” (Grateful Dead cover)[Video: Stand For Jam]While Hamilton (lead guitar) predominantly led the charge, each of the band’s talented members had their moments to shine. Both Bowling (keys) and Mullen (rhythm guitar) offered multiple “wow” moments, and the rock-solid rhythm section of Zwang (drums) and Lyons (bass) provided a sturdy foundation all evening.From here, Ghost Light begins an East Coast run that will last through next weekend before heading back out on the road again in May. They will also perform at large-scale festivals like LOCKN’, The Peach Music Festival, and more this summer. You can a list of Ghost Light’s upcoming April and May dates below. For a full list of upcoming Ghost Light tour dates, head to the band’s website. Below, you can see a gallery of photos from Ghost Light’s Brooklyn Bowl show with Magic Beans via photographer Andrew O’Brien.Setlist: Ghost Light | Brooklyn Bowl | Brooklyn NY | 4/11/18Set 1: untitled d-riff, Simple Gift of Man *, Streets of BrooklynSet2: If You Want It (title unconfirmed) > Sway > ** Lead Weight > Bullseye BluesE: Jack Straw **** Ghost Light Debut (Brothers Past)** Ghost Light Debut (Rolling Stones)*** Ghost Light Debut (Grateful Dead)Ghost Light April/May 2018 Tour Dates:April 12th – Ardmore Music Hall – Ardmore, PAApril 13th – The Acoustic – Bridgeport, CTApril 14th – Thunder Road – Boston, MAApril 17th – Gypsy Sally’s – Washington, DCApril 18th – Lincoln Theater – Raleigh, NCApril 19th – 5 Points Sanctuary – Roanoke, VAApril 20th – Asheville Music Hall – Asheville, NC^May 10th – Aggie Theatre – Fort Collins, CO^May 11th – Fox Theatre – Boulder, CO^May 12th – Globe Hall – Denver, CO^May 16th – City Winery – Chicago, IL^May 17th – Founders Brewery – Grand Rapids, MI^May 18th – Blind Pig – Ann Arbor, MI^May 19th – Grog Shop – Cleveland, OHView Tour DatesPhotos: Ghost Light with Magic Beans | Brooklyn Bowl | Brooklyn, NY | 4/11/18 | Credit: Andrew O’Brienlast_img read more


Professor evaluates influenza vaccine

first_imgVaccines are arguably one of the most important lines of defense against the spread of influenza, a common seasonal virus that can have uncommonly nasty effects in elderly individuals with compromised immune systems. Contrary to conventional wisdom, however, a recent study by assistant professor of biological science Benjamin Ridenhour found that in a comprehensive analysis of people ages 65 and over, the influenza vaccine was only about 20 percent effective, underscoring the need for better flu vaccines. Previous studies by researchers in the field focused on different age groups for determining the effectiveness of the influenza vaccine, and extrapolation led to an overstatement of the usefulness of the annual influenza vaccines in the elderly population, Ridenhour said. Individuals from this age group account for most of the roughly 25,000 people who die each year from influenza in the United States alone, Ridenhour said. “Normally the influenza vaccine – going with what the party line is – is about 60 percent effective, which is not great but definitely better than nothing,” Ridenhour said. “One of the big issues there is that this 60 percent number has come from studies of people that are between the ages of 20 and 65, and less than five. “So there are two age groups that we haven’t done a lot of studies on: one of those age groups is the elderly, 65 and over, and the other is the intermediate five to 18 year-old age group. There’s more concern for the elderly group because these are the people that die from flu.” Ridenhour’s novel findings hinged on access to a comprehensive, centralized database of health records from Ontario, Canada that also recorded all vaccinations received by individuals, he said, unlike the largely undocumented vaccination process in the United States.   “It turned out that going to Ontario was great because we had data as far back as 1993, so we had approximately 15 years of data that we looked at,” he said. “It encompassed all the elderly individuals in Ontario, so that’s a really nice facet of the study – you don’t have to worry about selecting a special sub-population, we got everybody.” Ridenhour said the low level of flu vaccine success in the elderly population that emerged from the data demonstrates how urgently improvement in the vaccine is needed. Part of his current research efforts focuses on strategies for developing a vaccine that would protect against the actual strain of influenza confronted by population, instead of an across-the-board estimated strain. “There are ways that you can predict the future and improve vaccine effectiveness,” he said. “Part of it has to do with where you pick your vaccine strains from because of the way flu circulates around the globe. If you pick your vaccine strains from different places they represent different snapshots in time, so if you pick from the right places you can predict what it will be the next time. “Doing that, you can actually come up with some of these strategies where you can produce two to three alternative vaccines that have multiple strains in them and you can produce higher vaccine effectiveness in the population as a whole by doing that.” Aside from researching development strategies for an improved vaccine, Ridenhour’s next step will be to investigate the environmental factors that play a key role in the spread of influenza, he said. “Right now our focus is going to stay in Canada, and we’re going to try and take the data we have and look at other factors that might be causing illness,” he said. “The effects of the environment are much less studied. It’s hard at the basic level to figure out how effective a vaccine is. Adding in other complicated factors, such as environmental ones, makes it even more difficult. But we have this great data set that we can actually do this with.” In the meantime, the best way to improve the effectiveness of the influenza vaccine is to improve coverage and have more people vaccinated, Ridenhour said. Typically only 30 to 40 percent of Americans go out and get vaccinated each year, which allows the flu to circulate more freely in the population. “Despite low effectiveness numbers, everybody should definitely go out and get vaccinated,” Ridenhour said.last_img read more


For ACT, euthanasia is a free market solution to health – why I will always oppose euthanasia in NZ

first_imgThe Daily Blog 9 June 2017Family First Comment: You won’t find us agreeing with Martyn Bradbury very often – and probably he with us. But this column is fascinating – and very revealing.#rejectassistedsuicide In a country with a mental health system as horrifically underfunded as ours, euthanasia would simply become a tread mill by faceless Wellington bureaucrats for cost cutting purposes on the most vulnerable.So David Seymour gets to debate his euthanasia bill.How awful.For ACT, euthanasia is a free market solution to health.In a country with a mental health system as horrifically underfunded as ours, euthanasia would simply become a tread mill by faceless Wellington bureaucrats for cost cutting purposes on the most vulnerable.Look at the way CYFS abuse children in its care.Look at the way mental health services shrug off their responsibilities for the suicide rates.Look at how Housing NZ don’t care about toddlers in freezing homes.Look at how the Ministry of Development simply shoves people into motels.Look at how WINZ torment rape victims and trap beneficiaries into debt.Are you seriously telling me the neoliberal welfare state of NZ cares about NZers so much they can be trusted with administering euthanasia?I don’t support euthanasia in NZ.I’ve heard the arguments, I’ve listened to the debate, and I just don’t support it.“If you were an animal you wouldn’t let it suffer” – Yes but we aren’t animals are we. We are self-conscious free thinking human beings.“Letting people live in pain is wrong”. Yes it is, and we have incredible pain management these days, only very rare cases are left to writhe in agony.“People have the right to end their life”. No they don’t. They may have the right to commit suicide if you want to go that far, but the right to ask another to end their life? That’s not been agreed to at all! This is a decision whanau and the wider community are all party to because of it’s ramifications upon the very fabric of our society.I have 3 main reasons I disagree with euthanasia in NZ.The first is the type of person and the reasons they push for euthanasia. It always seems to me to be alpha type personalities. Over achievers, people of deep independence who pride themselves on that independence. People who would consider the embarrassment of being unable to control their body functions worse than death itself. Their demand for death revolves around their inability to control the process of death. That doesn’t warrant allowing another to administer a medical cocktail that ends life.Which brings me to my second reason, the humility of death. Dying as a process isn’t supposed to be clean and efficient. It’s painful, it’s human, it requires the family and friends you’ve built in a lifetime to nurse you through your final moments. It is a deeply emotional time, a journey where the journey is far more important than the destination. The process of letting go, of saying goodbye is a deeply personal and intimate part of the human experience. To deny that is to deny one of the most important rituals of human life.But the biggest reason I would never want euthanasia in NZ is Jenny Shipley.READ MORE: http://thedailyblog.co.nz/2017/06/09/for-act-euthanasia-is-a-free-market-solution-to-health-why-i-will-always-oppose-euthanasia-in-nz/Keep up with family issues in NZ. Receive our weekly emails direct to your Inbox.last_img read more


USC prepares for NCAA championships

first_imgFinishing 29 strokes behind a conference rival doesn’t normally make for a successful tournament in college golf.But in a week that was all about surviving and advancing, the No. 10 USC men’s golf team was happy to do just that.The Trojans played solid but not spectacular golf on their way to a second place finish at the NCAA West Regional at the Gold Mountain Golf Complex in Bremerton, Wash., and earned a spot in next week’s NCAA championships.Young gun · Freshman T.J. Vogel tied with freshman Martin Trainer atop USC’s leaderboard after regionals with a three-round score of 219. – Courtesy USC Sports Information “This was a good week but not that fun,” USC coach Chris Zambri said. “It was kind of stressful because the whole season basically comes down to that week. To play well under that kind of pressure shows a lot about these guys.”Pac-10 champions No. 3 Washington won the regional going away, with three of its players finishing in the top three overall. San Diego, No. 24 Oregon State and No. 12 Illinois also qualified for the next round out of the 13-team regional.The Trojans got off to a rough start, sitting three strokes out of the fifth and final qualifying spot after a nine over par first round.“We were a little frustrated that we played poorly,” freshman Sam Smith said. “But we knew there were 36 holes left so there was plenty of time to get back into position.”Smith, who just secured the fifth spot in the Trojans’ lineup with a strong performance at the Pac-10 championships, paced USC with strong opening rounds of 73-72.“We felt like Sam carried us the first two days,” Zambri said. “He’s playing the best golf of the year and I think he can even play better.”USC shot 1 over par as a team in the second round to jump up into a tie for third place. The Trojans saved their best for last, posting a 1 under par final round to clinch their fourth straight trip to the NCAA championships.“We realized that we had to come in the top five teams and didn’t necessarily have to go out and beat the field by 29 shots like Washington did,” junior Matt Giles said.The Trojans advanced without any of their players finishing in the top 20 of the towurnament individually. Instead, USC relied on consistent play by all five golfers, posting no rounds lower than 70 and only one higher than 75.Freshmen T.J. Vogel (74-75-70) and Martin Trainer (75-72-72) led the way for the Trojans, finishing in a tie for 21st at 3 over par.Smith posted a final round 75 to place in a tie for 24th at 4 over par.Freshmen grabbed the top three spots for a young USC team that doesn’t have a senior.“Arguably we have the best freshmen class in the country right now,” Smith said. “We’re showing why with three guys in the lineup each week and we’re steadily improving.”Giles (77-72-72) and sophomore Steve Lim (75-73-73) tied for 29th at 5 over par.“I putted really poorly the first day and then actually played okay after that,” Giles said.USC will be joined at the NCAA championships, which begin Tuesday at The Honors Course in Chattanooga, Tenn., by seven other Pac-10 squads.Zambri said the Trojans were helped by playing against some of the nation’s best teams throughout the season.“We just had our best finish of the year and it didn’t feel like we played great,” Zambri said. “Then it dawned on me that we played against really great teams all year. Better competition in the Pac-10 makes all these kids better.”last_img read more


Wilcox axed as Scunthorpe United manager

first_img Russ Wilcox 1 Russ Wilcox has been sacked as manager of Scunthorpe United.The 50-year-old took over from Brian Laws in December last year after a caretaker spell in charge.He duly led the club on a record-breaking 28-game unbeaten run which resulted in automatic promotion from League Two.But the Iron have struggled on their return to League One, winning just two of their opening 11 games, and were dumped out of the Johnstone’s Paint Trophy by Notts County on Tuesday night.Wilcox has now been shown the door, while his assistant John Schofield has also had his contract terminated.A statement on the club’s official website rad: “Scunthorpe United have today terminated the contracts of manager Russ Wilcox and assistant manager John Schofield with immediate effect.“The club would like to place on record their thanks to Russ and John for their efforts, but in particular to Russ for leading the Iron into League One.“Andy Dawson will take charge of Saturday’s game at Gillingham, assisted by Tony Daws.”last_img read more


Gor to face Espérance in Champions League first round

first_imgGor now has a mountain task in handling Espérance who have been a hard nut to crack with the last time the two sides met seeing the North Africans thrashing the record 16 time KPL champions 8-2 on aggregate.Esperance de TunisEsperance had earlier dumped out ASAC Concorde of Mauritius with an emphatic 6-1 aggregate win.K’Ogalo will host the first leg between March 6-7 before travelling to Tunis for the return leg a week later.The winner between Gor and Esperance will grace the lucrative group stages – with the draw set for March 21.-Gor too sweet for Vegetarios-Gor Mahia defender Wellington Ochieng in action against Vegetarinos. Photo/RAYMOND MAKHAYAGor coach Dylan Kerr made eight changes from the team that beat Zoo Kericho 4-2 in a Kenyan Premier League match on Thursday last week with Boniface Oluoch returning to man the post as captain Harun Shakava partnered Joash Onyango in central defence.Wesley Onguso, Meddie Kagere and Shakava were the only faces that featured against Zoo while Ernest Wendo and Humphrey Mieno resumed their midfield roles.Godfrey Walusimbi started on the flanks alongside Francis Kahata with Kevin ‘Ade’ Omondi – who scored in the 2-0 first leg win in Machakos – playing behind lead striker Kagere.Gor Mahia’s Kevin Omondi in action against Leones Vegetarianos’ Jesus Tomasosngong during the first leg of the 2018 CAF Champions League played at the Machakos Stadium on 10th February 2018. Photo/RAYMOND MAKHAYAAfter a cagey start, Gor settled in the match towards the end of the first half which ended goalless.Leones took the lead in the 55th minute and pushed for another goal which would have taken the match to penalties.But Gor levelled after Francis Kahata’s corner was redirected into the net by a Vegetarianos player, making matters harder for the hosts as they now required to score three unanswered goal to progress.0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today) 0Shares0000Gor Mahia players jostle for space with Leones Vegetarianos. Photo/RAYMOND MAKHAYANAIROBI, Kenya, Feb 21 – Kenyan Premier League champions Gor Mahia will take on Espérance de Tunis in the first round of the CAF Champions League after eliminating Equatorial Guinea side Leones Vegetarianos 3-1 on aggregate in the preliminary stage.This is after K’Ogalo rallied a goal down to hold Vegetarianos 1-1 in the return leg played away in Malabo on Wednesday. The first leg staged in Machakos’ Kenyatta Stadium 10 days ago, ended 2-0 in favour of the Kenyan champions.last_img read more