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Saint Mary’s workshop addresses sexual harassment in the workplace

first_imgFueled by the mindset that a Saint Mary’s education cultivates exceptional leaders equipped with the knowledge to pinpoint and respond to injustice, the College hosted a workshop addressing sexual harassment in the workplace in Stapleton Lounge on Tuesday. Photo courtesy of Kara Kelly Chair of the department of English, Laura Haigwood, discusses sexual harassment and its impact on marginalized communities during a workshop held Tuesday in Stapleton Lounge.Chair of the English department, Laura Haigwood, who moderated a panel discussion preceding the workshop, said the College aims to prepare students to encounter harsh social realities.“This workshop is the brainchild of President Jan Cervelli, who wants to ensure all Belles have a toolkit for responding appropriately and effectively to sexual harassment, should it happen that you personally experience it,” Haigwood said.Treating men and women with equal respect in professional spaces demonstrates respect for basic human dignity, special assistant to Cervelli, Kara Kelly, said.“We are in a crucial moment in our culture, galvanized by the courageous #MeToo movement to address an issue that has, for too long, been willfully ignored — no more,” Kelly said. “Courageous women with much to lose, and many who have lost much for their resistance to this kind of abuse, have awakened us. We owe it to them, and to all who are part of our College, to root out this problem once and for all and to entrench the workplace quality that we all value.”Kelly said the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) reports that 75 percent of female employees have experienced sexual harassment.“That’s a staggering figure that should give all of us pause,” Kelly said. “For too many women, it rings all too true. Perhaps even more telling about the workplace culture in our country, the EEOC also reports that 90 percent of those who have experienced harassment never take formal action. It’s time to change such a chilling climate.”Navigating instances of sexual harassment can be difficult when the term itself is prone to varying interpretations, Saint Mary’s Title IX coordinator, Kris Urschel, said.“The formal definition is one thing, and we keep that … front and center at all times,” Urschel said. “I think it does warrant a little bit more conversation in terms of ‘What does that truly mean?’ and ‘What does that possibly look like in the workplace?’”Sexual harassment can prevent employees from fulfilling their assigned tasks and from producing the best quality of work, as they may struggle to feel accepted and valued as a working professional, Urschel said. “[Sexual harassment] … interferes with what we refer to as creating an intimidating or hostile work environment,” she said. Professor of history Jamie Wagman said up to 30 percent of college-aged women and up to 70 percent of women in the workplace have been sexually harassed, and their experiences can result in negative self-perceptions, denial of employment opportunities and threats to their physical safety.“Some states have enforced state and local-level legal protections against sexual harassment targeted at LGBTQ people, but currently 30 states have no protection,” Wagman said. “Also, transgender people are especially prone to job discrimination and sexual harassment, and they have little to no recourse.”The field of critical race feminism may serve as a helpful lens through which to view this issue, for it emphasizes the intersectionality of various forces at play, Wagman said. “Racialized sexual harassment calls upon sexual stereotypes of minority women, and this harassment is present across a variety of institutions and is associated with great post-traumatic stress syndrome,” Wagman said. “As Anita Hill wrote in ‘Speaking Truth to Power,’ sexual harassment is underreported. Only three percent of instances culminate in formal complaints.”Unwelcome or threatening behaviors disproportionately impact marginalized populations, such as women of color and individuals of a low socioeconomic class, Haigwood said.“There’s already been lots of discussion in relation to the ‘Me Too’ movement about the situation of women in food services and hospitality services who are, for a number of reasons, more vulnerable and less able to speak out than women who are comparatively more privileged,” Haigwood said. A work environment in which conditions of employment depend on sexual favors, physical acts or verbal requests for or innuendos to such acts perpetrates sexual harassment, Wagman said. “[Sexual harassment] can be verbal or physical,” she said. “It also can be non-verbal. Sexual harassment can occur in the workplace or in a learning environment, [such as in] a school or university. It can happen in many different scenarios, including after-hours conversations, exchanges in the hallways, non-office settings of employers or peers.”S-O-S Coordinator at the Family Justice Center of St. Joseph County Amelia Thomas said individuals who have experienced unwanted sexual comments or advances have the agency to decide that they were sexually harassed.“It doesn’t matter if someone means it in a joking manner,” Thomas said. “It’s up to victim to decide what is or is not okay. … Be cognizant of the fact that [sexual harassment] is not based on the person’s intent.”One major misconception surrounding sexual harassment involves the affected populations, Thomas said. “Harassment does not always have to be directed at a specific individual,” she said. “It can be something when you’re looking at groups, whether that’s gender or race or LGBTQ. … You can still make a report even if you’re not the direct victim. If you’re witnessing [behavior] that is offensive to you … you can still make a report, and that is considered sexual harassment.”Tags: EEOC, Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, Kris Urschel, Sexual harassment, Title IXlast_img read more


Former student creates sneaker business

first_img“I plan to go back to USC,” Hayman said.  “I really would love to graduate.” “My experiences at Cookies N’ Kicks have always been amazing,” said Hrak Araradian, a sneaker reseller who runs 213 Solez. “I’ve bought and sold sneakers with them in the past, and Eli is genuinely super kind.” “Eli is the most persistent person I’ve ever met,” said Dominiq Sotelo, co-owner of Cookies N’ Kicks. “If he wants something, he goes out and gets it.” Hayman, who moved from Australia, has been living in Los Angeles for 16 years. While living in the city, he has become increasingly familiar with sneaker culture and the community of sneakerheads, who buy and trade shoes. He said he buys what genuinely catches his eye, rather than buying certain sneakers to follow trends. “When this place came up, I approached my good friend at the time and my business partner,” Hayman said.  “I told him that I really thought this place would be killer for a sneaker store. It had a really nice look about it.” Customers walking into Cookies N’ Kicks, located on the iconic Melrose Avenue, are greeted with a friendly and laid-back ambience. The shoe store, complete with music blasting and the sounds of basketballs bouncing, has attracted celebrity customers like Lil Yachty, Offset, and Lamar Odom. This L.A. staple was created by Eli Hayman, a student who took a leave of absence. Before his start as a business owner, Hayman was a sneaker seller, making a profit on social media and other online selling platforms. Hayman was inspired by the sneaker industry and the opportunity for profit that came with selling sneakers. While he plans to go into the field of real estate, Hayman said Cookies N’ Kicks fit into his current ambitions.  Even though Melrose Avenue is heavily populated with sneaker stores, Hayman felt they were lacking in customer service. Part of his motivation for starting Cookies N’ Kicks was to create a friendlier environment focused on making the sneaker-buying experience more enjoyable for the customer.  He is currently working with different influencers and designing merchandisers to promote the brand, as well as creating a cleaning product for the store with his experience from his first business.   Former USC student Eli Hayman left school last year in order to pursue his sneaker business Cookies N’ Kicks, which has its storefront on Melrose Avenue. The store has attracted celebrity customers like Lamar Odam and Offset. (Colette Kanbarian | Daily Trojan) Hayman created his first business called Wype the Hype, a sneaker cleaning service previously on Melrose Avenue, while at USC. Hayman said he rarely slept while balancing work and school — he would arrive at the storefront at 9 a.m. and leave around 5 a.m. After the success of Wype the Hype, he left school and launched Cookies N’ Kicks in 2019. center_img His favorite class was Shaping Cities Through Real Estate, where he formed a close relationship with adjunct faculty Bret Nielsen. He would often look to Professor Nielsen for business and real estate advice, asking him about starting leases, and contracts. Hayman works with different business partners involved with the store. He focuses on financial side of things, such as keeping track of payments and taxes, while each business partner has their own role in maintaining and growing the business.  “Essentially what we do is, if you buy kicks, we give you cookies,” said Hayman, a former real estate development major. Last year, the 21-year-old decided to take a break from attending USC in order to pursue his business.  “I’m coming up with new and creative things that ultimately build the brand and make it worth more,” Hayman said.  “I don’t really do it for the money right now,” Hayman said.  “That’s not what’s important to me. The point is that we’re meeting every day, we’re meeting the coolest people and having the coolest opportunities.” The store features a basketball hoop, upstairs lounge area and an importance placed on providing a positive attitude. Currently, Cookies N’ Kicks has over 37,000 followers on Instagram. Even though Hayman said being a full-time student does not fit into his current lifestyle, Hayman wants to return in a few years and eventually get his degree. He said that his real estate classes were the most helpful part of his time at USC.  “I have the most random Converse collection of like 80 pairs of Converse,” Hayman said.  “If I like it, I’ll buy it.” But Hayman said that he is just getting started. He hopes to use Cookies N’ Kicks as a launching pad for the rest of his career, making important connections and learning through experience.last_img read more


Russell facing two-year ban

first_imgBRIDGETOWN, Barbados (CMC):Exciting West Indies all-rounder, Andre Russell, could face a doping ban after missing three doping tests within a 12-month period, media reports said yesterday.The 27-year-old Jamaican, a much-sought-after Twenty20 specialist, failed to make himself available for the tests, and under World Anti-Doping Agency rules this constitutes a positive finding.Once found guilty, Russell could be banned for up to two years.”We received notification of Russell’s violation about two weeks ago, and I’ve appointed a panel to hear his case,” Jamaica Anti-Doping Commission independent disciplinary panel chairman Kent Pantry was quoted as saying.The West Indies Cricket Board said it was aware of the situation.The globe-trotting Russell has turned out in almost every global domestic tournament over the last 12 months, playing in the Indian Premier League, the Caribbean Premier League, the South African Ram Slam, the Bangladesh Premier League and the Australian Big Bash.Only last month, he helped Islamabad United capture the inaugural Pakistan Super League title.Russell is currently with the West Indies squad in the United Arab Emirates where he is preparing for the Twenty20 World Cup later this month in India.Last week, he was named as a global ambassador for Nissan by the Japanese automaker.last_img read more