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Website fosters faith

first_imgThe Notre Dame Alumni Association launched a new website, FaithND, to extend the University’s spiritual resources beyond campus in an effort to fill a void for religious guidance online. Spirituality program director Angie Appleby Purcell said the site is available to people of all faith traditions interested in exploring Catholicism, even if they are not affiliated with the University. “As a Catholic university steeped in rich tradition, with wonderful resources of faculty, staff, students and alumni trying to live the University’s mission in terms of how to be a people of faith, a Catholic community into the world, we want to be able to provide good quality resources and enrichment for the spiritual and faith journey that we all are on,” Purcell said. FaithND offers a variety of informative services, such as video reflections on liturgical seasons and scripture passages, online courses and opportunities to ask questions about the Catholic faith, Purcell said. One of the best ways to stay engaged with one’s faith is to sign up for the daily email newsletter that includes the day’s Gospel reading, a written reflection on it, a short prayer and a profile of a saint, she said. “[Every morning] I grab my iPhone on the side of my bed, and I read the reflection and the prayer and the saint of the day, and many people start their day with that first step,” Purcell said. More than 9,000 people have signed up for the daily email subscription thus far, Purcell said. Another important feature of the website is the ability to submit prayer requests at the Grotto, a service that existed even before FaithND but is now streamlined. The Alumni Association received more than 24,000 of these requests last year, Purcell said, and they still manage to light a candle for every one. “The Grotto is a significant part of the spiritual imagination of people who are formed here,” she said “They can’t be there in that sacred space, but they certainly can allow us who are here on campus to pray on their behalf.” While most of these services fall under the sphere of prayer, the FaithND website includes three other sections: “Live,” “Serve” and “Explore.” The “Live” section provides monthly themes for reflection on how to live a life of faith, Purcell said. “This month, because we’re very mindful of November being All Saints [Day] and remembering holy people in our lives, we’re focusing on the call to holiness, not from the standpoint of ‘I have to be a Mother Teresa,’ but, ‘In my daily life, how am I called and how can I make decisions based on how to be a better, more holy person?’” she said. The “Serve” section focuses on ways to give back to the community of faith, Purcell said. “[It] talks about how through our faith we are called to service through Catholic Social Tradition, what does that look like, how are we at Notre Dame forming leaders for the Church?” she said. The “Explore” section addresses the intellectual aspects of faith, Purcell said, and it strives to answer the questions, “How do we explore the Catholic intellectual side of what we offer on campus, and how can that inform us as we move forward in life?” Purcell said FaithND was developed after months of research on the spiritual desires of the Notre Dame community, especially those of young alumni. “This came about ultimately from our constituency, our larger Notre Dame family, internally and externally, as to where Notre Dame could help them in continuing to grow in faith,” she said. “It was really a mandate from our constituency and our Notre Dame family.” Those interested in exploring the resources available though FaithND can visit faith.nd.edu Contact Tori Roeck at [email protected]last_img read more


Tennis: 2020 Wimbledon cancelled due to coronavirus

first_imgWimbledon has been cancelled for the first time since World War Two because of the coronavirus pandemic.The tournament was due to be played between 29 June and 12 July.The entire grass-court season has been abandoned, and there will be no professional tennis anywhere in the world until at least 13 July.Wimbledon is the latest major summer sporting event to be called off, with Euro 2020 and the Tokyo Olympics postponed for 12 months.It follows the postponement of the French Open, which was due to begin in May but has been rescheduled to 20 September-4 October.“This is a decision that we have not taken lightly, and we have done so with the highest regard for public health and the wellbeing of all those who come together to make Wimbledon happen,” said Ian Hewitt, All England Lawn Tennis Club chairma.“It has weighed heavily on our minds that the staging of the Championships has only been interrupted previously by World Wars but, following thorough and extensive consideration of all scenarios, we believe it is ultimately the right decision to cancel this year’s Championships, and instead concentrate on how we can use the breadth of Wimbledon’s resources to help those in our local communities and beyond.“Our thoughts are with all those who have been and continue to be affected by these unprecedented times.”Why decide now?The All England Club did not need to make a decision before the end of April, but the writing has been on the wall for some time.That is when on-site preparations would have had to begin in earnest: a forlorn hope given the current restrictions in place in the UK.As was the thought that by the end of June, 40,000 people would be able to take their seats in packed stands, and jostle for the best vantage point in the narrow walkways bordering the outside courts.The government’s advice that large gatherings should not take place is aimed, in no small part, at relieving the pressure on the emergency services, which would otherwise be in attendance. It is undeniably optimistic to assume the demands on the health service will have returned to normal levels by mid-summer.Swift cancellation should help reduce any losses that Wimbledon, and the LTA’s series of grass-court events, might incur – but there is also the issue of perception.The All England Club would not want to be seen to be pushing ahead with a sporting event as the death toll continues to rise and the country remains in the grip of the pandemic.Sticking resolutely to a place on the calendar, only to cancel abruptly, or postponing by a few weeks before having to concede defeat, is messy. It is not the way Wimbledon does things. Better, instead, to face facts and plan to return with a flourish in 2021.What about refunds and impact on finances?The All England Club had the foresight to take out insurance policies which will shield them from eye-watering losses. They will therefore be able to refund ticket holders, broadcast partners and sponsors – a bill which, even according to conservative estimates, will top £200m.The Lawn Tennis Association will also receive its ‘annual surplus’ of profits. The payment, which effectively funds British tennis’ governing body for the year ahead, was over £40m in 2018.It is likely to fall, but should not leave an irreparable hole at the heart of the LTA’s finances, especially as it has reserves of over £160mBut the LTA has lost over £12m in the past two years, and will also be hit by the loss of all of the summer grass-court events. Of those, only the Fever Tree Championships at Queen’s Club actually returns a profit, but as they are not insured against cancellation, this year’s losses will inevitably be greater.But the biggest blow for British tennis is the loss of the best shop window of the year. No Queen’s, Eastbourne or Wimbledon means no BBC TV exposure for the sport, and even if we are allowed to return to the courts, there is very unlikely to be the dramatic spike in participation usually seen in the months of June and July. Source: BBClast_img read more


Croatia beat Denmark in dramatic shoot-out

first_img0Shares0000Croatia players leap off in celebration after Ivan Rakitic’s penalty sent them to the World Cup quarter finals. PHOTO/FIFANIZHNIY NOVGOROD, Russia, Jul 1- Goalkeeper Danijel Subasic was the hero as Croatia squeezed into the World Cup quarter-finals with a penalty shoot-out victory over Denmark here Sunday.On a night of late, late drama Ivan Rakitic stroked home the decisive spotkick to ensure the Croats advanced to a last eight meeting with Russia after the two sides finished locked at 1-1 following extra-time. The Barcelona midfielder’s winner came after Milan Badelj and Josip Pivaric saw their penalties saved by Danish goalkeeper Kasper Schmeichel, who also saved an extra time penalty from Luka Modric.But Danes Christian Eriksen, Lasse Schone and Nicolai Jorgensen were thwarted by Subasic in the shootout to ensure Croatia won 3-2 and advanced to their first quarter-finals since the 1998 World Cup in France.The dramatic ending followed early excitement — but little in between.In an astonishing start to the match, both teams scored within four minutes via their first attacks.First, Mathias Jorgensen turned home in the second minute after Croatia failed to clear a long throw-in from Jonas Knudsen, the defender’s shot creeping under Subasic to give Denmark the perfect start.But any hopes they could hold onto their lead vanished within 90 seconds.With the Nizhny Novgorod stadium still rocking from the frantic start, Croatia went upfield and promptly equalised.Action between Croatia and Denmark in the World Cup last 16Again, the goal owed more than a little to bad defending when a Sime Vrsaljko cross was hammered by Henrik Dalsgaard into fellow Dane Andreas Christensen and the ball fell obligingly in the penalty area to Mario Mandzukic who scored.The explosive start — both sides hit the back of the net within three minutes and thirty seven seconds — was officially the quickest two teams have ever scored in a World Cup finals match.The following 116 minutes though largely failed to live up to the first four, fireworks giving way to a damp squib of an encounter as the game edged inexorably towards extra time and penalties.Billed as a clash between the opposing number 10s, Modric and Eriksen, it instead became increasingly attritional and tactical, with both playmakers unable to find any space.Instead the player who created most chances was Knudsen with his long throws.Few clear chances were created by either side until Modric’s late penalty miss.That came after Ante Rebic was fouled in the 116th minute Mathias Jorgensen, with the goal at his mercy.Modric stepped up but side-footed weakly and Schmeichel made the first of his three penalty saves on the night, all in vain, as his legendary goalkeeping father Peter punched the air in delight as he watched on in the stands.0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more